Southeast Asias megafauna

Unlike North America and Australia, many species of megafauna can still be found living in Southeast Asia. These include such charismatic species as the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), the orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), the Javan and Sumatran rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros sondaicus and Dicerorhinus sumatraensis), the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) and the tiger (Panthera tigris). Southeast Asia's extinct megafauna is less well known to general audiences, but include several species of...

Early Silurian Ireviken Event

The Silurian global paleogeography was dominated by the vast Gondwanan continent, which covered much of the southern circumpolar areas. Laurentia, Baltica, and Avalonia assembled in the large Laurussian contintent at equatorial latitudes (modified from Cocks and Torsvik 2002). The figure shows locations where previous studies have presented firm evidence for anomalies either in stable isotopes, biodiversity, or facies during the Ireviken Event. Stars with white dot indicate that the...

Late Silurian Lau Event

The figure shows locations where previous studies have presented firm evidence for anomalies either in stable isotopes, biodiversity, or facies during the Lau Event. Stars with white dot indicate that the cited study does not include stable isotope data. AU - Austria (Sch nlaub 1986 Wenzel 1997) CR - Czech Republic (Lehnert et al. 2003, 2007b), EB - East Baltic Area (Kaljo et al. 2003), NE - Nevada (Saltzman 2001), NSW - New South Wales (Talent et al. 1993), OK - Oklahoma (Saltzman...

Introduction

Mass extinction events affect a wide breadth of ecosystems and are one of the major driving mechanisms behind evolution, origination, and diversification of taxa. Such dramatic turnovers have therefore played a significant role in the history of life. The 'major five' mass extinctions (Raup and Sepkoski 1982) have received intense attention over the last 25 years, starting with the K-Pg impact hypothesis launched by Luis Alvarez and others in Science in 1980. By comparison, few studies have...

Discussion and conclusions

Since the paper of Alvarez et al. (1980), which was published in Science, the subject of delineating the causes of the K Pg mass extinction received several papers with different arguments. IDo-COctUOCTOCDO-ON NCOCOOOctCOCOCOOO Do-ifrCDOOCCfCTC-OO frUTUPUTUP(0(0(0Wt- DO-(NCNCNCN COCO COCO CO irnrcrcii BOO*-' ' * ' * ' ouwwxnuxnuxnu) Fig. 7. Bar chart for the oxygen excursion (518O) using isotope analysis of representatives of Cibicides spp. specimens across the K Pg boundary of the three...

Geological History

The Southeast Asian continental block is largely composed of elements, which had broken off from the southern super-continent Gondwanaland (Gatinsky and Hutchinson 1987 Metcalf 1990, 1996). Much of the modern geographical aspects of Southeast Asia occurred as a result of the fusion between the Sinoburmalaya and Cathaysia plates, in an event known as the Late Triassic Indosinian Orogeny (Hutchinson 2005). More plate collisions followed, including the collision of the Burma plate with Shan...

Types of current insect extinctions

While it is accepted that current insect extinction are basically a human induced process various authors emphasize individual causative factors. These isolated factors are usually global warming (Thomas et al. 2004) elevated carbon dioxide (Penuelas and Estiarte, 1998), co-extinctions (Dunn 2005 Koh et al. 2004), habitat Zschokke et al. 2000 (Tscharntke and Kruess 1999 Steffan-Dewenter and Tscharntke 2002 Londre and Schnitzer 2006) and habitat loss (Seabloom et al. 2002 Pimm and Raven 2000) or...

Late Ordovician mass extinction

Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, Minia 61519, Egypt, aelewa link.net The Ordovician period was an era of extensive diversification and expansion of numerous marine clades. Although organisms also present in the Cambrian were numerous in the Ordovician, a variety of new types including cephalopods, corals (including rugose and tabulate forms), bryozoans, crinoids, graptolites, gastropods, and bivalves flourished. Ordovican communities typically displayed a higher...

The Middle Silurian Mulde Event

The Middle Silurian Mulde Event refers to a faunal overturn and crisis at the top of the Lower Homerian stage. A spectacular mass extinction among the graptolites characterizes the event. The mass mortality is locally expressed by extremely dense bedding plane accumulations of a few single survivor species, sometimes literally blackening the bedding planes (Lenz et al. 2006). Contemporaneous formation of organic-rich shale, alum shale, and not least the formation of the so-called 'boundary coal...

Conserving insect biodiversity in city parks and road verges

Among the human structures that fragment in a definite way the habitat of many species are the roads (Saarinen et al. 2005). Many animals attempting to cross this barrier are being killed by traffic. For the United States it is estimated that the daily rate of road-killed vertebrates is one million (Ries et al. 2001). No similar rates for invertebrates have been estimated but this source of mortality is of minor importance compared to other mortality sources. When Ries et al. (2001) followed...

References Global Environment Humanrole

Anshari G, Kershaw AP, van der Kaars S (2001) A Late Pleistocene and Holocene pollen and charcoal record from peat swamp forest, Lake Sentarum Wildlife Reserve, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Palaeogeogr Palaeoclimat Palaeoecol 171 213-228 Batchelor BC (1979) Discontinuous rising Late Cainozoic eustatic sea-levels, with special reference to Sundaland, southeast Asia. Geologie en Mijnbouw 58 120 Batchelor DAF (1988) Dating of Malaysian fluvial tin placers. Journal of Southeast Asian Earth Sciences...

The Silurian marine scene

During the Silurian the continents were still largely unsettled which means that weathering processes, and the processes of erosion and transport of sediments from the continents to the shallow shelves must have differed substantially from post-Silurian times. The marine realm stood in sharp contrast to the silent land masses and yielded abundant and diverse life forms. The preceding Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event had resulted in a tremendous array of adaptive radiations among marine...

Reef builders

The scleractinian corals, important reef builders during the Triassic, suffered a marked decline at the end of the Triassic that was followed by a reef gap during part of the Early Jurassic (Hettangian-early Sinemurian), after which corals re-diversified to become the dominant reef builders (Stanley 1988). Stanley (2001, p. 26) viewed this as a rapid collapse of reefs at the TJB, concluded it was the result of a first-order mass extinction and noted that Jurassic recovery was slow. i< ji...

Temporal and spatial development and biodiversity

To be regarded a mass extinction an event should be (1) 'confined to a short interval of geological time, it should (2) affect a wide variety of clades occupying a wide spectrum of habitats and (3) it should eradicate a high proportion of species' (Brenchley and Harper 1998, p. 322 numbers added by the current author). These three prerequisites are only partly fulfilled by the Silurian global events, the minor amount of taxonomic loss during the Silurian global events being the main difference....

The Silurian events and carbonate platforms

Todays carbonate platforms - such as the Bahamas platform or the Great Barrier Reef - are major marine ecosystems that respond to a wide variety of changes in the contemporaneous oceans. They have a life cycle and a carbonate production rate that depends on the interaction of climate, relative sea-level, and biotic factors such as diversification rate. For this reason, environmental changes in coastal marine waters are reflected in the type of carbonate production and thus in the sediment...

References

Barber VA, Juday GP, Finney BP (2000) Reduced growth of Alaskan white spruce in the twentieth century from temperature-induced drought stress. Nature 405 668 Beerling DJ, Woodward FI (1996) Palaeo-ecophysiological perspectives on plant responses to global changes. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 11 20-23 Benes J, Kepka P, Konvicka M (2003) Limestone quarries as refuges for European xerophilous butterflies Conservation Biology 17 1058-1069 Benton MJ (1990) Vertebrate palaeontology. Boston Unwin...

Insect extinctions from climate change

It is well known that the climate of the earth becomes warmer (Parmesan 1996 Schmitt 2003) and this is going to continue for the next 50-100 years (Parmesan et al. 1999). This situation triggered various associated processes such as the decline of plants, which are important hosts for herbivorous insects (Barber et al. 2000 Scott et al. 2002 Petrakis and Legakis 2005). In this sense global warming cannot be separated from other sources of extinction such as habitat loss and co-extinctions. The...

Human overhunting in Southeast Asia

Synchrony of colonisation and extinctions in Southeast Asia is particularly difficult to establish, and is exacerbated by questions of human evolution and poor chronology of sites (Louys et al. 2007). Unlike North America and Australia, the earliest colonisers in Southeast Asia were not modern humans but Homo erectus. Evidence as to whether Homo erectus in Asia subsisted predominantly on a scavenging or hunting diet is still equivocal, although current evidence is suggestive that the former...

Insect mass extinctions in the past

It is known that insects are very different from other organisms at least in the distinction of background and mass extinction. The difference lies in the fact that insects are always dependent on other organisms and usually are important parts of local ecological communities. Labandeira and Philips (1996) record the late Carboniferous (Middle-Late Pennsylvanian stage - Fig. 1) extinction and consider that this is the first major insect extinction. At the same time an extinction of extensive...