Combination of House and Water Typologies

Different water circumstances require other types of houses. In the Table 4.1 is shown which combinations are possible.

For example, a floating house can be built in the relatively quiet circumstances of a seasonal storage, but to build this house in dynamical and fluctuating situations is not advisable. The slight drainage house is only suitable in situation with a high groundwater level, but will meet problems in any other circumstance.

Table 4.1 Matrix of water-house typologies combinations bron: www.waterbestendigbouwen.nl

Not possible / desired

Possible / desired under conditions

Possible and desired

Not possible / desired

Possible / desired under conditions

Possible and desired

Woningtypen

Piekberging

Seizoens--berging

Calamiteit-enberging

Hoogwater

overlast

Wet prrooff woning

A

Dry proof Woning

â– 

A

A

A

A

woning

<n

A

A

1

A

Kolom--woning

ft

A

0

0

Drijvende woning

A

A

A

A

A

Amfibische woning

A

A

A

A

A

Geringe droogleg--gingswoning

A

A

A

A

Risk is defined as the chance x the effect of a flood. The way to deal with risk is in each country and at each scale different (Table 4.2). On a national scale general standards need to be defined to guarantee safety and spatial planning of national importance needs to be programmed, for example the planning for the rivers in the Netherlands. On the regional scale a combination of approaches can be distinguished. Spatial planning on a regional scale, the development of hazard maps or a catalogue of possible measures to deal with different levels of risk are options. The

Table 4.2 Overview over project characteristics

Scale

Project

Content

Instrument

National

National Safety Policy

Protection level dike rings

Safety standards Room for the River

Water vision

Climate proof safety

Risk = chance x value

Regional

ELLA

Retention

Spatial measures

SAFER

Safety

Flood hazard maps

Flood Risk

Typology quick-slow and deep-shallow

Catalogue of measures

Local

Water typology Koshigaya

Water measures depending on environment Regulating pond

Spatial solutions Spatial measures

Building

Typology houses

Different measures for each house type

Catalogue of measures

House x Water

Possible combinations of house types and water environments

Matrix

local level is suitable for spatial measures. The different water environments are spatially treated different and the Japanese example shows an innovative way to deal with shortages and surpluses in a spatial manner. The building level shows mainly a catalogue approach. A pallet of solutions for buildings in different circumstances is defined.

Water is steering the spatial order and is at the same time the central key in dealing with climate change. This is especially true for the Netherlands, but also important in many other countries.

At the same time, adaptation to climate change in spatial planning as far as water management is concerned is not a big issue yet. Many initiatives and policies from the water sector are focussing on risk standards, safety standards and water typologies. Not many integrated plans can be distinguished so far. Water still is not seen as an element, which can be integrated in spatial planning in a flexible way. For instance: the way a surplus of water is treated is not really contributing to the spatial quality of plans, but mainly seen as something, to which an area has to be protected. This is a missed chance, because if spatial plans can make use of the available water the spatial quality of the area as well as the resilience could have been improved.

References

Bowker, P. (2GG7); Flood resistance and resilience solutions: an R&D Scoping Study, R&D Technical Report; Environment Agency. Department for Environment, Flood and Rural Affairs, Flood management Division

Commissie Waterbeheer 21ste eeuw (2GGG); Waterbeleid voor de 21ste eeuw, Geef water de ruimte en aandacht die het verdient Freistaat Sachsen (2GG6); Preventive Flood Management Measures by Spatial Planning for the

Elbe River Basin; ELLA; Dresden Hoogheemraadschap Rijnland (2GG3); Waterberging in beeld; Hoogheemraadschap Rijnland; Leiden

Koshigaya Land Development Office (2GG5); Motoara River, Oosagami Regulation Pond; Koshi-

gaya Lake Town, Saitama Prefecture; Koshigaya Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat (2GG7); Nederland veroveren op de toekomst, kabinetsvisie op het waterbeleid; Den Haag Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat, i.s.m. Ministeries van LNV en VROM (2GG6a); Brochure PKB Ruimte voor de Rivier, investeren in veiligheid en vitaliteit van het rivierengebied; Den Haag

Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat, i.s.m. Ministerie van VROM (2GG6b); Brochure 15 experimenten met bouwen in het rivierbed; Den Haag Rijcken, T. (2GG7); Gevangen in de risicospiraal? In: S&RO, augustus 2GG7-11-13 Ruimtelijk Planbureau (2GG7); Overstromingsrisico als ruimtelijke opgave; NAi Uitgevers, Rotterdam

SAFER (2GG8); SAFER: Strategies and Actions for Flood Emergency Risk Management; Federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg; Regierungspräsidium; Stuttgart Zeisler, P. (2GG5); Hochwassergefahrenkarten in Baden-Wuerttemberg; Umweltministerium, Innenministerium, Wirtschaftsministerium Baden-Wuerttemberg; Heidelberg, Wiesbaden

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