Decolorization

Investigation of the effect of oxidative coloration on the methangenetic toxicity and anaerobic biodegradability of aromatics showed that their oxidized solutions were less biodegradable in proportion to their color [66]. In contrast, the aerobic processes can have substantial aromatic removal efficiency, but these processes require sizeable energy expenditures in oxygen transfer and sludge handling [67].

An important step in the degradation of olive oil wastewater is the breakdown of colored polymeric phenolics (decolorization) to monomers, which may subsequently be mineralized. A significant correlation has been demonstrated between sewage decolorization and reduction of total organic carbon and phenolic content. However, decolorization of wastewaters appears to be associated only with a partial depolymerization. A decrease in the content of the lower molecular mass components and an increase in the proportion of components of intermediary molecular mass have also been demonstrated.

Crude oil wastewater and solutions of its brownish pigment change in both color and solubility as the result of pH modification. It appears that sewage decolorization may be produced simply by a process of adsorption or by adsorption associated with subsequent chemical modification of chromophores.

The effluent is acidified as a consequence of fungal growth. A considerable decrease in pH and an elevated adsorption of lignin-derived products onto the biological matrix suggested that the decolorization process was an indirect effect of culture acidification. The sewage decolorization eventually stops with time, suggesting that the putative enzymes responsible for decolorization have a defined lifetime.

Many recalcitrant compounds from olive oil mill wastewater are present in the colored fraction. Optimum culture conditions will be identified for the decolorization of that sewage by Phanerochaete flavido-alba for subsequent use in bioremediation assays. Of several media tested, nitrogen-limited P. flavido-alba cultures containing 40 pg/mL Mn(II) were the most efficient at decolorizing oil wastewater. Decolorization was accompanied by a 90% decrease in the phenolic content of the wastewater. Concentrated extracellular fluids alone (showing manganese peroxidaze, but not lignin peroxidaze activity) did not decolorize the major olive oil wastewater, suggesting that mycelium binding forms part of the decolorization process [38].

In batch cultures, or when immobilized on polyurethane, Ph. chrysosporium is able to degrade the macromolecular chromophores of oil wastewater and decrease the amount of phenolic compounds with low molecular weight. Pleurotus ostreatus and Lentinus edodes also decrease the total phenolic content and reduce the color of cultures containing oil wastewater.

Decolorization of juices and wastewaters by Duolite XAD 761 resin is widely used on an industrial scale and is particularly useful for the removal of color, odor, and taste from various organic solutions in the food and pharmaceutical industries. It removes color, protein, iron complexes, tannins, hydroxymethyl furfural and other ingredients responsible for off-flavors, according to the Duolite Company. The degree of adsorption tends to increase with molecular weight in a given homologous series and has more affinity for aromatic than aliphatic compounds. Recovery of coloring compounds and pigments from agroindustrial products is a common practise [24].

The following case study offers detailed information about the efficiency of resin application in decolorization of olive mill effluents.

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