Criteria for Accumulation of Waste Oil in Underground Storage Tanks

Home Based Recycling Business

Make Money in the Recycling Business

Get Instant Access

The Massachusetts criteria (310 CMR 30.690) for accumulating waste oil in underground storage tanks (USTs), including those resting directly on the ground, are generalized below:

1. For leak detection in old tanks containing waste oil that were installed before October 15, 1983 under a grandfather clause, a dipstick test must be conducted every 30 days;

a more than :in. (1.27 cm) difference in level within a 24 hour period must be reported to the State government; underground tanks containing other hazardous wastes must undergo a tightness test, and must be monitored on a daily basis;

2. Tanks installed after the effective date (October 15,1983) of a new Massachusetts law regarding underground storage tanks must have secondary containment and a monitoring system or be constructed of a corrosion-resistant material; and

3. A log must be kept of all test results for at least three years.

11.9 STORAGE TANK INSPECTION AND LEAK DETECTION

11.9.1 Requirements for Underground Storage Tanks

The State of New York [11-14,55] has promulgated rules and regulations for the early detection of leaks or potential leaks of petroleum bulk storage by plant owners and operators. In the State of New York [14], underground tanks shall be checked for leakage using one or more of the following:

1. Inventory monitoring may be used if it detects a leak of one percent (1%) of flowthrough plus 130 gal on a monthly basis and is coupled with an annual tightness test. Inventory monitoring must be done.

2. Weekly monitoring of the interstitial space of a double-walled tank may be practiced using pressure monitoring, vacuum monitoring, electronic monitoring, or manual sampling.

3. Vapor wells for monitoring soils in the excavation zone may be used. Vapor monitoring systems must be designed and installed by a qualified engineer or technician in accordance with generally accepted practises. Wells must be protected from traffic, permanently labeled as a "monitoring well" or "test well—no fill" and equipped with a locking cap, which must be locked when not in use so as to prevent unauthorized access and tampering. Vapor monitoring may be used only under the following conditions: (a) soils in the excavation zone must be sufficiently porous to allow for the movement of the vapors from the tank to the vapor sensor; gravel, coarse and crushed rocks are examples of porous soils; (b) the stored substance or a tracer compound placed in the tank must be sufficiently volatile so as to be detectable by the vapor sensor; (c) vapor monitoring must not be hindered by groundwater, rainfall, or soil moisture such that a release could go undetected for more than 30 days; (d) background contamination must not mask or interfere with the detection of a release; (e) the system must be designed and operated to detect increases in vapors above background levels; monitoring must be carried out at least once per week; and (f) the number and positioning of vapor monitoring wells must be sufficient to ensure detection of releases from any portion of the tank and must be based on a scientific study; wells must be at least four inches in diameter.

4. Groundwater monitoring wells designed and installed by a qualified engineer or technician may be used. Wells must be protected from traffic, permanently labeled as a "monitoring well" or "test well—no fill" and equipped with a locking cap that must be locked when not in use to prevent unauthorized access and tampering. Groundwater monitoring may be used only under the following conditions: (a) the substance stored must be immiscible in water and have a specific gravity of less than one; (b) the groundwater table must be less than 20 ft from the ground surface; the hydraulic conductivity of the soil between the tank and well must not be less than one hundredth (0.01) cm/s; gravel and coarse to medium sand are examples of such soil; (c) the slotted portion of the well casing must be designed to prevent migration of soil into the well and must allow entry of the hazardous substances into the well under both high and low groundwater conditions; (d) wells must be at least four inches in diameter and be sealed from the ground surface to the top of the filter pack to prevent surface water from entering the well; (e) wells must be located within the excavation zone or as close to it as technically feasible; (f) the method of monitoring must be able to detect at least one-eighth ¿of an inch of free product on top of the groundwater; monitoring must be carried out once per week; and (g) the number and positioning of the groundwater monitoring well(s) must be sufficient to ensure detection of releases from any portion of the tank and must be based on a scientific study.

5. Automatic tank gauging equipment may be used if it can detect a leak of two-tenths (0.2) of a gallon per hour or larger with a probability of detection of 95% and probability of false alarm of 5% or less. Monitoring must be carried out once per week; or

6. Other equivalent methods as approved by the Department if the method can detect a leak of two-tenths (0.2) of a gallon per hour with a 95% probability of detection and probability of false alarm of 5%.

In the State of New York, underground and on-ground piping shall also be checked for leakage by the owner or the plant manager according to the general guidelines established by the Department of Environmental Conservation [14].

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Trash Cash Machine

Trash Cash Machine

How recyclable trash can save the world and bank us huge profits! Get All The Support And Guidance You Need To Be A Success At Recycling! This Book Is One Of The Most Valuable Resources In The World When It Comes To How To Make Profits With Trash!

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment