Decaying Tropical Cyclones

Some of the largest precipitation amounts received as the result of a single meteorological event have been associated with the movement of tropical cyclones (e.g., hurricanes, cyclones, and typhoons) poleward and over continents. These powerful cyclonic storms carry large amounts of warm moist air over land surfaces. While wind speeds associated with these storms decrease quickly after landfall, these decaying storms are capable of delivering precipitation over wide areas during a relatively short period of time, on the order of days to weeks. In some cases cyclonic storms associated with the polar front may exacerbate conditions by introducing a lifting mechanism that leads to increased condensation and precipitation. The relatively low-lying coastal plain of eastern North America is especially susceptible to damage from these types of storms (Bailey and Patterson, 1975; Hirschboeck, 1988). For example, see Figure 3. In 1998 hurricane Mitch produced as much as 50 to 75

Figure 2 (see color insert) (4 panels): These scenes show various sections of the Mississippi River near St. Louis before and just after the 1993 floods, which peaked in late July/early August. The images show the area as seen by the l.andSat Thcmatic Mapper (TM) instrument. The short-wave infrared (TM band 5), infrared (TM band 4), and visible green (TM band 2) channels are displayed in the images as red, green, and blue, respectively. In this combination, barren and/or recently cultivated land appears red to pink, vegetation appears green, water is dark blue, and artificial structures of concrete and asphalt appear dark gray or black. Reddish areas in the scenes during the flood show where water had started to recede, leaving barren land. See ftp site for color image.

Figure 2 (see color insert) (4 panels): These scenes show various sections of the Mississippi River near St. Louis before and just after the 1993 floods, which peaked in late July/early August. The images show the area as seen by the l.andSat Thcmatic Mapper (TM) instrument. The short-wave infrared (TM band 5), infrared (TM band 4), and visible green (TM band 2) channels are displayed in the images as red, green, and blue, respectively. In this combination, barren and/or recently cultivated land appears red to pink, vegetation appears green, water is dark blue, and artificial structures of concrete and asphalt appear dark gray or black. Reddish areas in the scenes during the flood show where water had started to recede, leaving barren land. See ftp site for color image.

inches of precipitation in some areas of Central America. At least 11,000 deaths were associated with hurricane Mitch and more than 3 million people were left homeless or were severely affected (www.ncdcjioaa.gov/ol/reports/mitch/ mitch.html).

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment