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with increased monsoon downpours and high tides to flood out more than twenty million Bangladeshis. Hundreds were killed."4

On July 20,2007, an unprecedented amount of rain fell on England. In parts of Gloucestershire, months of rain fell in only a few hours, rivers overflowed, and water treatment plants were flooded, leaving more than 350,000 people without drinking water.

Other regions are also threatened by increased precipitation. In 2007, for example, West Africa experienced its heaviest rainfall in decades. Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo, was inundated, with 30 deaths caused by the flooding in a single day, while in Ghana 300,000 people had to leave their homes because of the downpour. In all, the deluge "affected 1.5 million people across the continent, killing at least 300 since early summer," according to National Geographic reporter Alexis Okeowo.5 The title of Okeowo's National Geographic article was "Global Warming Causing African Floods, Experts Say." As it suggests, newspapers and other popular sources sometimes directly attribute events like the 1998 Bangladeshi floods or the 2007 African floods to global warming. For example, on July 20, 2007, an unprecedented amount of rain fell on England. In parts of Gloucestershire, months of rain fell in only a few hours, rivers overflowed, and water treatment plants were flooded, leaving more than 350,000 people without drinking water. These dramatic events led Michael McCarthy, the environment editor of The Independent, to declare, "It's official: the heavier rainfall in Britain is being caused by climate change, a major new scientific study will reveal this week, as the country reels from summer downpours of unprecedented ferocity."6

The study McCarthy referred to was undertaken by Xuebin Zhang and Francis Zwiers of Environment Canada. These scientists, however, did not in fact say "that the July 20 rainfall in

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