Table 832

Effluent Pretreatment Standards of a New Source of the Aluminum Basis Material Subcategory that Introduces Pollutants into a POTW

Maximum for Any 1 Day Maximum for Monthly Average

Pollutant Metal Preparation Coating Operation Metal Preparation Coating Operation

(mg/m2 of Area Processed or Coated)

Chromium Lead Nickel Zinc

Chromium Lead Nickel Zinc

(lb/106 ft2 of Area Processed or Coated) 0.10 0.30

Source: U.S. EPA; Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Volume 27, Part 466, Washington, DC, July 1, 2003 [47 FR 53184, Nov. 24, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 36545, Sept. 6, 1985].

8.10 TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGIES USED IN THE PORCELAIN ENAMELING INDUSTRY

1. Porcelain enameling. This is the entire process of applying a fused vitreous enamel coating to a metal basis material. Usually this includes metal preparation and coating operations.3-7

2. Basis material. This is the metal part or base onto which porcelain enamel is applied.

3. Area processed. This is the total basis material area exposed to processing solutions.

TABLE 8.33

New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of the Copper Basis Material Subcategory

Maximum for Any 1 Day Maximum for Monthly Average

TABLE 8.33

New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of the Copper Basis Material Subcategory

Maximum for Any 1 Day Maximum for Monthly Average

Pollutant

Metal Preparation

Coating Operation

Metal Preparation

Coating Operation

(mg/m2 of Area Processed or Coated)

Chromium

6.23

G.46

2.52

0.19

Lead

1.69

G.13

1.52

0.11

Nickel

9.25

G.69

6.23

0.47

Zinc

17.16

1.29

7.G7

0.53

Aluminum

5G.97

3.82

2G.86

1.56

Iron

2G.69

1.55

1G.6G

0.79

Oil and grease

168.23

12.6G

168.23

12.60

TSS

252.35

18.91

2G1.88

15.12

pH

7.5-lG.Ga

7.5-lG.Ga

7.5-lG.Ga

7.5-10.0a

(lb/106 ft2 of Area Processed or Coated)

Chromium

1.28

G.1G

G.52

0.04

Lead

G.35

G.G3

G.31

0.03

Nickel

1.9G

G.14

1.28

0.10

Zinc

3.52

G.27

1.45

0.11

Aluminum

1G.44

G.78

4.27

0.32

Iron

4.24

G.32

2.17

0.16

Oil and grease

34.46

2.58

34.46

2.58

TSS

51.69

3.87

41.35

3.10

pH

7.5-lG.Ga

7.5-lG.Ga

7.5-lG.Ga

7.5-10.0a

Source: U.S. EPA; Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Volume 27, Part 466,

Washington, DC, July 1, 2003 [47 FR 53184, Nov. 24, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 36545, Sept. 6, 1985]. Note: Any new source must achieve the NSPS a Within this range at all times.

TABLE 8.34

Effluent Pretreatment Standards of a New Source of the Copper Basis Material Subcategory that Introduces Pollutants into a POTW

Maximum for Any 1 Day Maximum for Monthly Average

Pollutant

Chromium Lead Nickel Zinc

Chromium Lead Nickel Zinc

Metal Preparation

Coating Operation Metal Preparation

(mg/m2 of Area Processed or Coated) 0.46 2.52

(lb/106 ft2 of Area Processed or Coated) 0.10 0.52

Coating Operation

4. Area coated. This is the area of basis material covered by each coating of enamel.

5. Coating operations. This includes all of the operations associated with preparation and application of the vitreous coating. Usually this incorporates ball milling, slip transport, application of slip to the workpieces, cleaning and recovery of faulty parts, and firing (fusing) of the enamel coat.

6. Metal preparation. This comprises any and all of the metal processing steps preparatory to applying the enamel slip. Usually this includes cleaning, pickling, and applying a nickel flash or chemical coating.

7. Control authority. This is defined as the POTW if it has an approved pretreatment program; in the absence of such a program, this is the NPDES State if it has an approved pretreatment program or U.S. EPA if the State does not have an approved program.

8. Precious metal. This means gold, silver, or platinum group metals, and the principal alloys of those metals.

REFERENCES

1. Rutti, B., Early Enameled Glass, in Roman Glass: Two Centuries of Art and Invention, Newby M. and Painter K., Eds., Society of Antiquaries of London, London, 1991.

2. Gudenrath, W., Enameled Glass Vessels, 1425 BCE to 1800: the Decorating Process, Journal of Glass Studies, 48, 374, 2006.

3. U.S. EPA, Draft Development Document for Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, EPA-440179072a, U.S. EPA, Washington, DC, 1979.

4. U.S. EPA, Proposed Development Document for Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, EPA-440181072b, U.S. EPA, Washington, DC, 1981.

5. U.S. EPA, Development Document for Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, final report EPA-440182072, U.S. EPA, Washington, DC, 1982.

6. U.S. Government Printing Office, Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Volume 27, Part 466, U.S. GPO, Washington, DC, July 1, 2003.

7. U.S. EPA, Porcelain Enameling Point Source Category, available at http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/ cfr/waisidx_03/40cfr466_03.html, 2008.

8. Higgins, T. E., Pollution Prevention Handbook, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1995.

9. Wikipedia Encyclopedia, Vitreoud Enamel, available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitreous_enamel, March, 2008.

10. Wang, L.K., Hung, Y.T., and Shammas, N.K., Eds., Physicochemical Treatment Processes, Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, 2005.

11. Wang, L.K., Hung, Y.T., and Shammas, N.K., Eds., Advanced Physicochemical Treatment Processes, Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, 2006.

12. Wang L.K., Hung Y.T. and Shammas N.K., Eds., Advanced Physicochemical Treatment Technologies, Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, 710 pages, 2007.

13. Wang, L.K., Shammas, N.K., and Hung, Y.T., Eds., Biosolids Treatment Processes, Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, 2007.

14. Wang, L.K., Shammas, N.K., and Hung, Y.T., Eds., Biosolids Engineering and Management, Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, 2008, pp. 396-398.

15. Wang, L.K., Hung, Y.T., Lo, H.H., and Yapijakis C., Eds., Handbook of Industrial and Hazardous Wastes Treatment, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, NY, 2004.

16. U.S. ACE, Yearly Average Cost Index for Utilities, in Civil Works Construction Cost Index System Manual, 110-2-1304, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC, available at http://www.nww. usace.army.miL/cost, 2008.

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