W

water absorption of visible light by 9 and agricultural sequestration 45

in Great Plains 196 and greenhouse effect 10 in midwestern U.S. 193 in Pacific Northwest 199-200 southeastern U.S. 192 in western U.S. 197-198 waterfowl 146-147, 158-159 water pollution 70, 72, 162-163 water table 196

water vapor 2, 9-10, 19, 27, 235c Waxman, Henry 167 Wayburn, L. A. 93 weather 61, 104. See also extreme weather events Weishampel, John 152, 154 West, Tristam O. 43, 45 West Antarctic ice sheet 131, 183, 205 Western Climate Initiative 218 Western Kentucky Carbon Storage

Foundation 50 western United States 196-198 wetlands destruction 131, 165, 189 wildfires 65, 94, 107, 123, 127-128, 194, 198

wildlife 141-170, 144, 147, 151 climate change's effect on forests 110-112

laws in force to help 145-146, 154155, 166-170 refuges at risk 158-166, 161 timing of seasonal events 152-158 Wildlife and Wetlands Toolkit for

Teachers and Interpreters 125 Wilkins Ice Shelf 239c wind energy 231, 239c Wofsy, Steven C. 94, 97 World Climate Research Programme

235c World War II 70

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Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

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