Scientific Consensus

According to most commentators and scientists, the IPCC reports establish that there is a scientific consensus that climate change is occurring and that it is the result of human activities. In 2004, Naomi Oreskes, a science professor at the University of California at San Diego, surveyed 928 abstracts of peer-reviewed papers related to global climate change and found that none of them disagreed with the IPCC position. In a widely discussed article published in the journal Science, Oreskes stated, "Scientists publishing in the peer-reviewed literature agree with IPCC, the National Academy of Sciences, and the public statements of their professional societies [that global warming is caused by human activities]."11

Today, most scientists continue to support the conclusions of the IPCC. In a joint statement issued in 2007 (after the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report was released), science academies in the major industrialized countries—including Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States—as well as a number of developing nations, stated: "It is unequivocal that the climate is changing, and it is very likely that this is predominantly caused by the increasing human interference with the atmosphere. These changes will transform the environmental conditions on Earth unless counter-measures are taken."12

Members of the IPCC attend the IPCC XXVII opening session ceremony on November 12, 2007. Most scientists support the conclusions of the IPCC that climate changes are occurring due to human activities.

Members of the IPCC attend the IPCC XXVII opening session ceremony on November 12, 2007. Most scientists support the conclusions of the IPCC that climate changes are occurring due to human activities.

Global warming skeptics

Despite the apparent convergence of scientific opinion on the causes and dangers of global warming, a few skeptics remain. Most skeptics agree that global temperatures are increasing, but they believe that temperature fluctuations are relatively small and primarily caused by natural forces.

One area of disagreement, for example, revolves around a temperature graph used by global warming advocates called the "hockey stick" (because it is shaped like a hockey stick). This graph, usually attributed to University of Massachusetts geoscientist Michael Mann, shows that there have been virtually no global temperature variations over the past thousand years in the Northern Hemisphere, except during the last hundred years, when temperatures have sharply peaked, presumably due to humans' use of fossil fuels. Some critics of this graph cite errors in the Mann analysis, and others charge that it conveniently omits natural temperature fluctuations

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Solar Panel Basics

Solar Panel Basics

Global warming is a huge problem which will significantly affect every country in the world. Many people all over the world are trying to do whatever they can to help combat the effects of global warming. One of the ways that people can fight global warming is to reduce their dependence on non-renewable energy sources like oil and petroleum based products.

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