Annual Carbon Emissions by Region

- Western Europe

Centrally Planned East Asia Eastern Europe & Former Soviet States India & Southeast Asia Australia, Japan, Pacific Ocean States Central & South America

- Middle East

- Africa

1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200

1800

1850

1900

1950

2000

This figure shows the annual fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions, in million metric tons of carbon, for a variety of non-overlapping regions covering the Earth. Data source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. Regions are sorted from largest emitter (as of 2000) to the smallest:

United States and Canada Western Europe (plus Germany)

Communist East Asia (China, North Korea, Mongolia, etc.)

Eastern Europe, Russia, and Former Soviet States

India and Southeast Asia (plus South Korea)

Australia, Japan and other Pacific Island States

Central and South America (includes Mexico and the Caribbean)

Middle East

Africa

Ice Age Temperature Changes

450 400

350 300 250 200 150 Thousands of Years Ago

100 50

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This figure shows the Antarctic temperature changes during the last several glacial/interglacial cycles of the present ice age and a comparison to changes in global ice volume. The present day is on the right.

The first two curves show local changes in temperature at two sites in Antarctica as derived from deuterium isotopic measurements (5D) on ice cores (EPICA Community Members 2004, Petit et al. 1999). The final plot shows a reconstruction of global ice volume based on 518O measurements on benthic foraminifera from a composite of globally distributed sediment cores and is scaled to match the scale of fluctuations in Antarctic temperature (Lisiecki and Raymo 2005). Note that changes in global ice volume and changes in Antarctic temperature are highly correlated, so one is a good estimate of the other, but differences in the sediment record do not necessarily reflect differences in paleotemperature. Horizontal lines indicate modern temperatures and ice volume. Differences in the alignment of various features reflect dating uncertainty and do not indicate different timing at different sites.

The Antarctic temperature records indicate that the present interglacial is relatively cool compared to previous interglacials, at least at these sites. It is believed that the interglacials themselves are triggered by changes in Earth's orbit known as Milankovitch cycles and that the variations in individual interglacials can be partially explained by differences within this process. For example, Overpeck et al. (2006) argues that the previous interglacial was warmer because of increased solar radiation at high latitudes. The Liesecki and Raymo (2005) sediment reconstruction does not indicate significant differences between modern ice volume and previous interglacials, though some other studies do report slightly lower ice volumes/higher sea levels during the 120 ka and 400 ka interglacials (Karner et al. 2001, Hearty and Kaufman 2000). It should be noted that temperature changes at the typical equatorial site are believed to have been significantly less than the changes observed at high latitude.

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Sixty-Five Million Years of Climate Change

50 40 30 Millions of Years Ago

2 00

This figure shows climate change over the last 65 million years. The data is based on a compilation of oxygen isotope measurements (518O) on benthic foraminifera by Zachos et al. (2001), which reflect a combination of local temperature changes in their environment and changes in the isotopic composition of seawater associated with the growth and retreat of continental ice sheets.

Because it is related to both factors, it is not possible to uniquely tie these measurements to temperature without additional constraints. For the most recent data, an approximate relationship to temperature can be made by observing that the oxygen isotope measurements of Lisiecki and Raymo (2005) are tightly correlated to temperature changes at Vostok, Antarctica as established by Petit et al. (1999). Present day is indicated as 0. For the oldest part of the record, when temperatures were much warmer than today, it is possible to estimate temperature changes in the polar oceans (where these measurements were made) based on the observation that no significant ice sheets existed and hence all fluctuation in (518O) must result from local temperature changes (as reported by Zachos et al.).

The intermediate portion of the record is dominated by large fluctuations in the mass of the Antarctic ice sheet, which first nucleates approximately 34 million years ago, then partially dissipates around 25 million years ago, before re-expanding toward its present state 13 million years ago. These fluctuations make it impossible to constrain temperature changes without additional controls. Significant growth of ice sheets did not begin in Greenland and North America until approximately 3 million years ago, following the formation of the Isthmus of Panama by continental drift. This ushered in an era of rapidly cycling glacials and interglacials (upper right). Also appearing on this graph are the Eocene Climatic Optimum, an extended period of very warm temperatures, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (labeled PETM). Due to the coarse sampling and averaging involved in this record, it is likely that the full magnitude of the PETM is underestimated by a factor of 2 to 4 times its apparent height.

3.5 3 2.5 Millions of Years Ago

This figure shows the climate record of Lisiecki and Raymo (2005) constructed by combining measurements from 57 globally distributed deep-sea sediment cores. The measured quantity is oxygen isotope fractionation in benthic foraminifera, which serves as a proxy for the total global mass of glacial ice sheets.

Lisiecki and Raymo constructed this record by first applying a computer-aided process of adjusting individual "wiggles" in each sediment core to have the same alignment (i.e.. wiggle matching). Then the resulting stacked record is orbitally tuned by adjusting the positions of peaks and valleys to fall at times consistent with an orbitally driven ice model (see Milankovitch Cycles). Both sets of these adjustments are constrained to be within known uncertainties on sedimentation rates and consistent with independently dated tie points (if any). Constructions of this kind are common, however, they presume that ice sheets are orbitally driven, and hence data such as this can not be used in establishing the existence of such a relationship.

The observed isotope variations are very similar in shape to the temperature variations recorded at Vostok, Antarctica, during the 420 kyr for which that record exists. Hence the right-hand scale of the figure was established by fitting the reported temperature variations at Vostok (Petit et al. 1999) to the observed isotope variations. As a result, this temperature scale should be regarded as approximate and its magnitude is only representative of Vostok changes. In particular, temperature changes at polar sites, such as Vostok, frequently exceed the changes observed in the tropics or in the global average. A horizontal line at 0 degrees C indicates modern temperatures (circa 1950).

Labels are added to indicate regions where 100 kyr and 41 kyr cyclicity is observed. These periodicities match periodic changes in Earth's orbital eccentricity and obliquity, respectively, and have been previously established by other studies (not relying on orbital tuning).

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable.

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