Highlevel Debris Transport

In the accumulation area, debris falling onto the surface from adjacent rock walls or nunataks will become buried by fresh accumulations of snow. The debris will become concentrated in layers along the primary ice stratification formed by

Glacial Geology: Ice Sheets and Landforms Second Edition Matthew R. Bennett and Neil F. Glasser © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Figure 7.1 Debris transport pathways through atypical valley glacier. Two transport pathways can be identified: (i) a high-level pathway in which the debris does not come into contact with the bed; and (ii) a low-level pathway in which the debris is in contact with the bed. [Diagram reproduced with permission from: Boulton (1993) in Holmes' Principles of Physical Geology (ed. P.McL.D Duff), Chapman and Hall, figure 20.35, p. 425]

Figure 7.1 Debris transport pathways through atypical valley glacier. Two transport pathways can be identified: (i) a high-level pathway in which the debris does not come into contact with the bed; and (ii) a low-level pathway in which the debris is in contact with the bed. [Diagram reproduced with permission from: Boulton (1993) in Holmes' Principles of Physical Geology (ed. P.McL.D Duff), Chapman and Hall, figure 20.35, p. 425]

successive annual layers of accumulation (Box 7.1). The debris therefore follows an englacial path and will emerge from the glacier in the ablation zone to form a supraglacial cover as the ice surface is lowered by melting. Debris that accumulates

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