Likely Impacts Of Climate Change On Energy System Operations

Energy2green Wind And Solar Power System

Wind Energy DIY Guide

Get Instant Access

In addition to producing climate-forcing agents, the U.S. energy sector itself is expected to be affected by climate change and will need to adapt to the accompanying changes. Research on the possible impacts on energy system operations is still in its infancy; therefore, the examples noted below are merely illustrative of the ways climate change could affect energy systems (see the companion report Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change [NRC, 2010a]).

TABLE 14.1 Summary of Activities for Deploying New Energy Technologies and Strategies

CCTP Goal Area

Technology Strategies

lai ic

n

oi

n

it

a

d

a ni

n

n

fi

a

im

g

e

ni le

e s s id

h t o

b

d

al

n

n

a

,n

oi it

y

s e vi it

oi it a

a

ci lo

c

mr

p

n

u d E

ro f ni

x aT

e c ni

Energy End-Use and Infrastructure

Energy Supply

Carbon Sequestration

Non-CO2

Greenhouse Gases

Transportation

Buildings

Industry

Electric Grid and Infrastructure

Low-Emission, Fossil-Based Fuels and Power Hydrogen

Renewable Energy & Fuels Nuclear Fission

Carbon Capture Geologic Storage Terrestrial Sequestration

Methane Emissions from Energy and Waste Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Ag riculture

Emissions of High Global-Warming Potential Gases Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Combustion and Industrial Sources

Totals

54

29

58

21

45

14

19

7

23

15

11

6

48

30

7

4

5

5

4

4

18

12

14

3

8

7

17

3

14

9

345

169

NOTE: Column totals represent the number of deployment activities impacting the 15 technology strategies. Totals are indicative measures of relative frequency of application. Double counting occurs because a single deployment activity may impact multiple technology strategies. The count does not include activities that are authorized but not implemented. SOURCE: DOE, 2009c.

cn n

Coalitions & partnerships

International cooperation

Market conditioning, includi government procurement

Technology demonstration

Codes and standards

Legislative act of regulation

Risk mitigation

24

15

16

12

10

7

1

22

15

20

5

14

5

3

28

13

4

6

2

1

2

11

12

4

6

1

3

1

8

14

5

6

2

1

1

2

5

3

4

3

0

1

19

19

18

11

7

7

2

3

7

2

2

0

0

2

4

6

2

4

0

0

1

4

7

2

3

1

1

1

7

8

5

2

0

0

1

7

9

1

1

0

2

1

1

6

1

0

0

0

2

15

6

1

0

2

0

1

10

7

2

3

6

5

1

165

149

86

65

48

32

21

Ol c

SeHIJOIJd |BDS|J ßU|19dLU03

ÂimeiJSDun ÂDi|0d sjniDnJis ÂJisnpui

SUO!lBl!LUn 9jniDnJlSBJJU|

U0!1BLUJ0JU| IDSJJSdlUI PUB 919|dlU0DU|

S>|Siy |BDIULjD9J_

siso3 puB siijsusg |BUJ9ixg

T3 c to 01

CL CL

en ai c

T3 c to ai

• Increases in energy demands for cooling and decreases in energy demands for heating can be expected across most parts of the country. These changes could drive up peak electricity demands, and thus capacity needs, but could also reduce the use of heating oil and natural gas in winter.

• Even as electricity demand increases in many regions, climate change may affect energy production. For example, o Water availability for cooling is a critical resource at thermal electric power plants (e.g., gas, coal, oil, CSP, bioenergy, and nuclear plants). Water limitations in parts of the country, and increased demand for water for other uses, may result in less water for use in energy production. o Increased water temperatures may reduce the cooling capacity of available water resources. o Water flows at hydropower sites may increase in some areas and decrease in others.

• Changes in river flows and sea levels may affect ship and barge transportation of coal, oil, and natural gas (as well as hydrokinetic energy sources).

• Changes in circulation and weather patterns may change the efficiency of electricity generation by solar and wind farms. For example, increased cloudiness could reduce solar energy production, and wind energy production could be reduced if wind speeds increase above or fall below the acceptable operating range of the technology. Not all of the possible impacts on intermittent renewable energy sources are well understood.

• Large-scale deployment of bioenergy may cause large new stresses on water supplies for growing the biofuel crops and processing them into usable liquid, gaseous, or solid fuels.

• Changes in the severity and frequency of extreme weather events—including hurricanes, floods, droughts, and ice storms—may disrupt a wide range of energy system operations, including thermal power plants, transmission lines, oil and gas platforms, ports, refineries, wind farms, and solar installations. Changes in sea levels (together with subsidence) could also threaten coastal energy system operations.

As with the other impacts of climate change discussed in this report, most of these impacts on energy production and use will be highly variable and place-dependent.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment