Dichapetalaceae

Guild: np

Life form: large winding woody climber Max. height: 20 m long (herbarium) Max. diameter: 1 cm (herbarium, Breteler 1978) Leaf: alternate, simple, ovate to elliptic, notophyll (1-5 x 3-13 cm), entire, herbaceous, with prominent nerves beneath; with small stipules (1-3.5 mm long) Inflorescence: axillary, branched, with up to 10 flowers

Flower: small; corolla bowl-shaped, pale yellow to bright brownish green, 5-merous Fruit: fleshy, obovoid to ellipsoid (2 x 3 cm), smooth, mesocarp sweet and juicy, orange; 1-2 seeds

Seed: ovoid, large (1.7 x 0.7 cm), brown Other: it has a shrubby habit when young or when growing in thickets. Later in life it occurs as a slender climber. The branches have lenticels.

Distribution

Continent: Upper Guinea endemic (Breteler 1978) Upper Guinea: Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana (herbarium, Breteler 1978)

Distribution type: continuous, widespread, present in 11 30' cells

Forest type: wet evergreen forest, moist evergreen forest, moist semi-deciduous forest, dry semi-deciduous forest, secondary forest. In Ghana, mainly found in moist evergreen forest (Hall & Swaine 1981). Locally abundant.

Habitat

Species occurrence increases at low altitudes (logistic regression analysis). It is mostly found in areas where rainfall is around 1500-2500 mm/yr (Chi2 test), and closer to rivers or lagoons (Chi2 test). Frequently found in secondary forests of

Dichapetalaceae

different stadia (open clearcuts to very old ones). Also at roadsides, around houses, and sometimes, on dry and very eroded hillsides. Usually on sandy or sandy-clayish but also on lateritic soils.

Regeneration

It has a hypogeal germination, cotyledons remain enclosed in the endocarp (Breteler 1973), and it regenerates in shade (Hall & Swaine 1981). However, most herbarium records come from very open areas (herbarium).

Phenology

Dispersal: by animals (Breteler 1973) Timing: flowering period from September to December and May to June; fruiting period from December to January (De Koning 1983)

Dispersal: by animals (Breteler 1973) Timing: flowering period from September to December and May to June; fruiting period from December to January (De Koning 1983)

Data sources

Breteler (197S, 1978), Hall & Swaine (1981), De Koning (198S)

Oplan Termites

Oplan Termites

You Might Start Missing Your Termites After Kickin'em Out. After All, They Have Been Your Roommates For Quite A While. Enraged With How The Termites Have Eaten Up Your Antique Furniture? Can't Wait To Have Them Exterminated Completely From The Face Of The Earth? Fret Not. We Will Tell You How To Get Rid Of Them From Your House At Least. If Not From The Face The Earth.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment