Araliaceae

Guild: pi

Life form: large tree

Max diameter: 90 cm (FWTA)

Leaf: alternate, digitally compound, 5-9 leaflets, elliptic, mesophyll (5-8 x 11-21 cm), entire, glabrous; petiole up to 1 m long; stipules 3-7 mm long, persistent, triangular

Inflorescence: clustered at the end of the branches, not branched (spike)

Flower: small, whitish; sessile; glabrous

Fruit: fleshy, ellipsoid (0.5 x 0.7 cm), red, borne on leafless branches

Seed: medium-sized (0.6 x 0.35 x 0.25 cm) Other: it has a thick bark with deep fissures.

Distribution

Continent: Nigeria (herbarium), Cameroon (uncertain record, according to Bamps, 1974) Upper Guinea: Liberia, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana Distribution type: continuous, widespread, present in 8 30' cells, distribution range is 1461 km, Red List species (vulnerable)

Forest type: wet evergreen forest, moist evergreen forest, moist semi-deciduous forest, dry semi-deciduous forest, secondary forest

Habitat

Thought by Aubréville (1959) and De Koning (1983) to have been planted in Banco, Côte d'Ivoire and not to occur there naturally, possibly having survived in the forest from a long-since abandoned farm or village (De Koning 1983). They also noted that this species has been collected mostly in Ghana. Even in Ghana, however, this tree is not common, but the species regenerates freely in many areas (e.g. Atewa Forest Reserve) (Hawthorne 1995a). It is most abundant in disturbed evergreen forests and in rocky or mildly sloping sites (Hawthorne 1995a). Sometimes found as spare trees in plantations (herbarium).

Regeneration

It has a phanerocotylar epigeal foliaceous seedling type (cf. de la Mensbruge 1966).

Phenology

Uses

The wood is used to make drums (Hawthorne 1995a).

Data sources

FWTA, Aubréville (1959), De la Mensbruge (1966), Bamps (1974), De Koning (1983), Hawthorne (1995a), IUCN Red List (2000), Kasparek (2000), Hawthorne & Jongkind (2004)

most abundant in disturbed evergreen forests and in rocky or mildly sloping sites (Hawthorne 1995a). Sometimes found as spare trees in plantations (herbarium).

It has a phanerocotylar epigeal foliaceous seedling type (cf. de la Mensbruge 1966).

Data sources

FWTA, Aubréville (1959), De la Mensbruge (1966), Bamps (1974), De Koning (1983), Hawthorne (1995a), IUCN Red List (2000), Kasparek (2000), Hawthorne & Jongkind (2004)

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