Lubricants

• Fuels for which no carbon is stored.

Fuels used as feedstocks, such as naphtha, natural gas, gas/diesel oil, LPG or ethane:

This subsection on feedstocks applies only to the industry source category.

1 Estimating fuel quantities

The amount of fuel used as a feedstock for non-energy purposes is entered in Column A of Auxiliary Worksheet 2.

2 Converting to TJ

The appropriate conversion factor is inserted in Column B. Feedstock use (Column A) is multiplied by the relevant conversion factor to give the feedstock use in TJ. The result is entered in Column C of Auxiliary Worksheet 2.

3 Calculating carbon content

The feedstock use in TJ (Column C) is multiplied by the emission factor in tonnes of carbon per terajoule (Column D) to give the carbon content in tonnes C (Column E). The figures are divided by 103 to express the amount as gigagrammes of carbon. The results are entered in Column F of Auxiliary Worksheet 2.

4 Calculating actual carbon stored

The carbon content (Column F) is multiplied by the fraction of carbon stored (Column G) to give the carbon stored. The result is entered in Column H of Auxiliary Worksheet 2.

After completion of Auxiliary Worksheet 2

5 The amount of carbon stored for the relevant fuel/ product is entered in Column H of Worksheet 2 for the industry source category.

6 The amount of carbon stored (Column H) is subtracted from the carbon content (Column F) to give net carbon emissions. The results are entered in Column I.

Lubricants:

It has been estimated that during the first use, recycling and final disappearance of lubricants, approximately half of the production is oxidised as CO2.

1 For each sector where lubricants are used, the fraction of carbon stored for lubricants is entered in Column G. The default value of 0.5 is used for this publication.

2 The carbon content (Column F) is multiplied by the fraction of carbon stored (Column G) to obtain the amount of carbon stored. The result is entered in Column H.

3 The amount of carbon stored (Column H) is subtracted from the carbon content (Column F) to obtain the net carbon emissions. The result is entered in Column I.

Bitumen and coal tars:

Bitumen and coal tars are usually not combusted but used in a manner that stores almost all of the carbon. Emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from the use of bitumen for road paving are estimated in the industrial processes chapter.

Fuels for which no carbon is stored:

Step 4 is skipped and the values from Column F are entered in Column I before continuing with Step 5.

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