Military aviation

Military activity is defined here as those activities using fuel purchased by or supplied to the military authorities of the country. Emissions from aviation fuel use can be estimated using equation 3.6.1 and the same calculations approach recommended for civilian aviation. Some types of military transport aircraft and helicopters have fuel and emissions characteristics similar to civil types. Therefore default emission factors for civil aircraft should be used for military aviation unless better data are available. Alternatively, fuel use may be estimated from the hours in operation. Default fuel consumption factors for military aircraft are given in Tables 3.6.7 and 3.6.8. For fuel use factors see Section 3.6.1.3 'Choice of activity data'.

Table 3.6.7

Fuel consumption factors for military aircraft

Group

Sub- group

Representative type

Fuel flow(kg/hour)

Combat

Fast Jet - High Thrust

F16

3 2S3

Fast Jet - Low Thrust

Tiger F-5E

2 1GG

Trainer

Jet trainers

Hawk

72G

Turboprop trainers

PC-7

12G

Tanker/transport

Large tanker/ transport

C-13G

2 225

Small Transport

ATP

499

Other

MPAs Maritime Patrol

C-13G

2 225

Sources: Tables 3.1 and 3.2 of Gardner et. al 1998 USEPA, 2005)

Table 3.6.8

Fuel consumption per flight hour for military aircraft

Aircraft Type

Aircraft Description

FUEL USE (Litres per HOUR)

A-10A

Twin engine light bomber

2 331

B-1B

Four engine long-range strategic bomber. Used by USA only

13 959

B-52H

Eight engine long-range strategic bomber. Used by USA only.

12 S33

C-12J

Twin turboprop light transport. Beech King Air variant.

39S

C-130E

Four turboprop transport. Used by many countries.

2 956

C-141B

Four engine long-range transport. Used by USA only

7 S49

C-5B

Four engine long-range heavy transport. Used by USA only

13 473

C-9C

Twin engine transport. Military variant of DC-9.

3 745

E-4B

Four engine transport. Military variant of Boeing 747.

17 339

F-15D

Twin engine fighter.

5 S25

F-15E

Twin engine fighter-bomber

6 951

F-16C

Single engine fighter. Used by many countries.

3 252

KC-10A

Three engine tanker. Military variant of DC-10

1G GG2

KC-135E

Four engine tanker. Military variant of Boeing 707.

7 134

KC-135R

Four engine tanker with newer engines. Boeing 707 variant.

6 G64

T-37B

Twin engine jet trainer.

694

T-38A

Twin engine jet trainer. Similar to F-5.

262

Military aircraft (transport planes, helicopters and fighters) may not have a civilian analogue, so a more detailed method of data analysis is encouraged where data are available. Inventory compilers should consult military experts to determine the most appropriate emission factors for the country's military aviation.

Due to confidentiality issues (see completeness and reporting), many inventory compilers may have difficulty obtaining data for the quantity of fuel used by the military. Military activity is defined here as those activities using fuel purchased by or supplied to the military authorities in the country. Countries can apply the rules defining civilian, national and international aviation operations to military operations when the data necessary to apply those rules are comparable and available. In this case, the international military emissions may be reported under International Aviation (International Bunkers), but must then be shown separately. Data on military fuel use should be obtained from government military institutions or fuel suppliers. If data on fuel split are unavailable, all the fuel sold for military activities should be treated as domestic.

Emissions resulting from multilateral operations pursuant to the Charter of the United Nations should not be included in national totals; other emissions related to operations shall be included in the national emissions totals of one or more Parties involved. The national calculations should take into account fuel delivered to the country's military, as well as fuel delivered within that country but used by the military of other countries. Other emissions related to operations (e.g., off-road ground support equipment) shall be included in the national emissions totals in the appropriate source category.

These data should be used with care as national circumstances may vary from those assumed in this table. In particular, distances travelled and fuel consumption may be affected by national route structures, airport congestion and air traffic control practices.

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