Additional Equations for Biomass in Settlements

Equation 8.1

Annual carbon change in live biomass pools in settlements remaining settlements

ACB = ACTrees + ACShrubs + ACHerbs

Where:

ACb= annual carbon accumulation attributed to biomass increment in Settlements Remaining Settlements, tonnes C yr-1

ACTrees = annual carbon accumulation attributed to biomass increment in trees in Settlements Remaining Settlements, tonnes C yr-1

ACShrubs = annual carbon accumulation attributed to biomass increment in shrubs in Settlements Remaining Settlements, tonnes C yr-1

ACHerbs = annual carbon accumulation attributed to biomass increment in herbaceous biomass in

Settlements Remaining Settlements, tonnes C yr-1

Equation 8.2

Annual biomass increment based on total crown cover area

Where:

ACg= annual carbon accumulation attributed to biomass increment in Settlements Remaining Settlements, tonnes C yr-1

ATjj= total crown cover area of class i in woody perennial type j, ha

CRWjj = crown cover area-based growth rate of class i in woody perennial type j, tonnes C (ha crown cover)-1 yr-1

Equation 8.3

Annual biomass growth based on number of individual woody plants in broad

CLASSES

Where:

ACg= annual carbon accumulation due to live biomass increment in Settlements Remaining Settlements, tonnes C yr-1

NTjj = number of individuals of class i in perennial type j

Cj = annual average carbon accumulation per class i of perennial type j, tonnes C yr-1 per individual

C. equations for dead organic matter

Equation 2.17

Annual change in carbon stocks in dead organic matter acdom = acdw + aclt

Where:

AC = annual change in carbon stocks in dead organic matter (includes dead wood and litter), tonnes C

yr-1

ACdw = change in carbon stocks in dead wood, tonnes C yr-1 AClt = change in carbon stocks in litter, tonnes C yr-1

Equation 2.18

Annual change in carbon stocks in dead wood or litter (Gain-Loss Method)

Where:

AC DOM = annual change in carbon stocks in the dead wood/litter pool, tonnes C yr-1 A = area of managed land, ha

DOMin = average annual transfer of biomass into the dead wood/litter pool due to annual processes and disturbances, tonnes d.m. ha-1 yr-1

DOMout = average annual decay and disturbance carbon loss out of dead wood or litter pool, tonnes d.m. ha-1 yr-1

CF = carbon fraction of dry matter, tonne C (tonne d.m.)-1

Where:

AC = annual change in carbon stocks in dead wood or litter, tonnes C yr-1

A = area of managed land, ha

DOMt1 = dead wood/litter stock at time t1 for managed land, tonnes d.m. ha-1 DOMt2 = dead wood/litter stock at time t2 for managed land, tonnes d.m. ha-1 T = (t2 - t1) = time period between time of the second stock estimate and the first stock estimate, yr

= carbon fraction of dry matter (default = 0.37 for litter), tonnes C (tonne d.m.)-

Equation 2.20

Annual carbon in biomass transferred to dead organic matter

DOMin = {Lmortality + Lsiash + (Ldisturbance * f BLol )}

Where:

DOMin = total carbon in biomass transferred to dead organic matter, tonnes C yr-1

Lmortaiity = annual biomass carbon transfer to DOM due to mortality, tonnes C yr-1 (See Equation 2.21)

Lsiash = annual biomass carbon transfer to DOM as slash, tonnes C yr-1 (See Equations 2.22)

Ldisturbances = annual biomass carbon loss resulting from disturbances, tonnes C yr-1 (See Equation 2.14)

fBLol = fraction of biomass left to decay on the ground (transferred to dead organic matter) from loss due to disturbance. As shown in Table 2.1, the disturbance losses from the biomass pool are partitioned into the fractions that are added to deadwood (cell B in Table 2.1) and to litter (cell C), are released to the atmosphere in the case of fire (cell F) and, if salvage follows the disturbance, transferred to HWP (cell E).

Note: If root biomass increments are counted in Equation 2.10, then root biomass losses must also be counted in Equations 2.20, and 2.22.

Equation 2.21 Annual biomass carbon loss due to mortality

Where:

Lmortality = annual biomass carbon loss due to mortality, tonnes C yr-1 A = area of land remaining in the same land use, ha

Gw = above-ground biomass growth, tonnes d.m. ha-1 yr-1 (see Equation 2.10) CF = carbon fraction of dry matter, tonnes C (tonne d.m.)-1 m = mortality rate expressed as a fraction of above-ground biomass growth

Equation 2.22 Annual carbon transfer to slash

Where:

Lsiash = annual carbon transfer from above-ground biomass to slash, including dead roots, tonnes C yr-1

H = annual wood harvest (wood or fuelwood removal), m3 yr-1

BCEFr = biomass conversion and expansion factors applicable to wood removals, which transform merchantable volume of wood removal into above-ground biomass removals, tonnes biomass removal (m3 of removals)-1. If BCEFR values are not available and if BEF and Density values are separately estimated then the following conversion can be used:

BCEFr = BEFr • D o D is basic wood density, tonnes d.m. m-3

o Biomass Expansion Factors (BEFR) expand merchantable wood removals to total aboveground biomass volume to account for non-merchantable components of the tree, stand and forest. BEFR is dimensionless.

R = ratio of below-ground biomass to above-ground biomass, in tonne d.m. below-ground biomass (tonne d.m. above-ground biomass)-1. R must be set to zero if root biomass increment is not included in Equation 2.10 (Tier 1) CF = carbon fraction of dry matter, tonne C (tonne d.m.)-1

Where:

AC™,, = annual change in carbon stocks in dead wood or litter, tonnes C yr-1

Co = dead wood/litter stock, under the old land-use category, tonnes C ha-1 Cn = dead wood/litter stock, under the new land-use category, tonnes C ha-1 Aon = area undergoing conversion from old to new land-use category, ha

Ton = time period of the transition from old to new land-use category, yr. The Tier 1 default is 20 years for carbon stock increases and 1 year for carbon losses.

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