A storm with many names

Hurricane actually comes from the name Huracan, the god of evil to the Tainos tribe from Central America. Other parts of the world use different terms for these storms. In the western Pacific and China Sea, they are called typhoons. Typhoon comes from the Cantonese word "tai-fung," which means "great wind." In countries such as Pakistan, India, Australia, and Bangladesh, they are called cyclones. In the Philippine Islands they are called baguios. The true scientific term for the storm is tropical cyclone. A cyclone is simply a very large system of rotating air that pivots around a point of low pressure. It is only the tropical cyclones, which have warm air in the centers, that have the potential to become the powerful, destructive storms we know as hurricanes.

According to Christopher Landsea, the Science and Operations Officer at the National Hurricane Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the following all mean hurricane:

Foracan

hericane

uracano

heuricane

harauncana

hurlicano

furacane

hyrricano

herican

uracan

harrycain

haracana

hurlecan

duracana

herocane

haurachana

oraucan

haroucana

urycan

hurleblast

foracane

hericano

furicano

jimmycane

haraucane

hyrracano

hauracane

ing vegetation, making it vulnerable to wildfire from lightning strikes). Because the winds change direction, firefighters must plan their strategy accordingly, so that they are prepared for abrupt changes in the path of the fire.

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