O

Esters—Organic compounds having the general formula of RC-OR', where R and R' are hydrocarbon groups.

Eucaryotes—Protists that contain chromosomes; they possess true nucleus.

Fat—The product formed from the reaction of glycerol and saturated fatty acid.

Fatty acid—A long-chain organic acid.

Fatty alcohols—Alcohols that look and feel like lipids or fats.

Filtrable solids—The colloidal and dissolved fractions of total solids that pass through a filter in a prescribed laboratory procedure.

Fixed solids—Portions of the various forms of solids that remain as a residue when the sample is decomposed at 600°C.

Five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)—The BOD for an incubation period of five days.

Flagellum—Whiplike prolongation of the protoplasm.

Free ammonia—Molecular NH3 dissolved in water formed as the hydrolysis product of organic nitrogen.

Gametes—Protozoal cell capable of sexual reproduction.

Glycerolphosphatides—Another name for phosphoglycerides.

Gram-negative bacteria—Bacteria with a surface stain using crystal violet, or gentian violet treated with iodine that can be removed by flooding with alcohol, acetone, or aniline.

Gram-positive bacteria—Bacteria with a surface stain using crystal violet, or gentian violet treated with iodine that cannot be removed by flooding with alcohol, acetone, or aniline.

Grease—Waxes, complex lipids (fats, oils, and phospholipids), and mineral oils such kerosene, crude oil, and lubricating oil and similar products.

Imhoff cone—A vessel shaped like a cone used to measure settleable solids.

Kjeldahl nitrogen—The sum of ammonia and organic nitrogens.

Kw—Called the ion-product of water, it is a product of the activities of H+ and OH- when any given temperature is constant.

LAS—Linear alkyl benzene sulfonate.

Mathematical expectation—The average value obtained if the random variable is measured exceedingly many times.

Metaphosphoric acid—A condensed phosphate of the formula (HPO3)n.

Mitochondrion—The site for the electron-transport and the respiratory enzyme systems in eucaryotes.

Multiple-tube or MPN technique—A method of estimating the concentration of coliforms using the Poisson distribution.

Nitrobacter—Genus of bacteria responsible for the conversion of nitrite-nitrogen to nitrate-nitrogen.

Nitrosomonas—Genus of bacteria responsible for the conversion of ammonia-nitrogen to nitrite-nitrogen.

Nonfiltrable solids—The settleable and nonsettleable fractions of solids that did not pass through a filter in a prescribed laboratory procedure.

Nucleus—A membrane-enclosed organelle inside the cell containing the genetic material of the cell.

Odor—The perception registered by the olfactory nerves in response to some external stimulus caused by substances.

Oil—The reaction products from the reaction of glycerol and unsaturated fatty acid.

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