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UrbHeat

The urban heat island phenomenon and potential mitigation strategies

A long-term strategy of planting shade trees and installing reflective materials for roofs and pavements can mitigate the urban heat island effect and help reduce associated economic, environmental and health-related costs. When the sun beats down on buildings covered with dark-coloured roofing materials, most of the heat collected by the roof is transferred inside, increasing the demand for air-conditioning. Installing highly reflective roofs will keep buildings cooler and reduce energy bills. Research conducted in Florida and California indicates that buildings with highly reflective roofs require up to 40 percent less energy for cooling than buildings covered with darker, less reflective roofs. Roads, parking lots, and driveways paved with dark, heat-absorbing materials (e.g., asphalt) also contribute to the urban heat island effect. Increasing the albedo of these surfaces through the use of reflective paving materials will help to reduce the surrounding ambient air temperature. http://www.asu.edu/caed/proceedings99/ESTES/ESTES.HTM

Estes, M.G., V. Gorsevski, C. Russell, D. Quattrochi and J. Luvall, 1999: The urban heat island phenomenon and potential mitigation strategies. Arizona State University, http://www.asu.edu/

Part of development planning

Likely link— assessment by LAs

Likely link-assessment by LAs

Non-

climate disaster

Local

Few

Win-win

Social consensus

Policy

Medium cost to implement

Local

Multipliers could be significant

Medium term (5-20 years)

Unmanaged ecosystem

Neutral or ambiguous effect

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Acronym

Title

Description

Citations

Driver

Link to CC (mitigation)

Link to CC (adaptation)

Extremes

Actors

Number

Conflict

Framework

Planning

Cost

Geography

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Timing

Ecosystems

Poverty

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