Tables

2.1. The global carbon budget 19

2.2. Plant carbon, soil carbon, and net primary production in the world's major biomes 23

3.1. Summary of pools and their vulnerability over the next 20 years and over the course of the 21st century 50-51

3.2. Summary of marine carbon cycle feedbacks 62

4.1. The gap for the six SRES illustrative scenarios for atmospheric CO2 concentrations ranging from 450 ppm to 750 ppm (PgC/year) 85

4.2. The gap for the six SRES illustrative scenarios for atmospheric CO2 concentrations ranging from 450 ppm to 750 ppm (EJ/year) 85

4.3. Allowed carbon emissions for WRE 450 and WRE 750 stabilization pathways 93

4.4. Impact of climate feedback on carbon sinks and global warming in the Hadley and IPSL simulations 96

5.1. Categorization of mitigation options by timescale to achieve a significant proportion of possible reductions and by potential magnitude of CO2 equivalent impact on radiative forcing 107

5.2. Magnitude of R&D needed driven by CO2 mitigation needs 108-111

5.3. Estimates of storage capacity of geologic reservoirs 116

5.4. Potential for non-CO2 greenhouse gas abatement and biosphere carbon storage 120

6.1. Current (1990-1999) global average values for terms in the global carbon budget and the quantities P, ge, f i 134

6.2. Assessment of positive and negative climate, economic, environmental, and sociocultural impacts associated with mitigation strategies 143

6.3a. Scenario drivers taken from the SRES scenarios and total carbon gap from Chapter 4, this volume 154

6.3b. Increase in food demand under each scenario 155

6.3c. Impacts of scenarios on the pressure on land for food production 155

9.1. Chemically reactive greenhouse gases and their precursors: Abundances, trends, budgets, lifetimes, and GWPs 206-207

9.2. Current global emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases expressed as equivalent amounts of carbon (Ceq) in CO2 using GWPs with a 100-year time horizon 208

12.1. Estimates of mean ocean CO2 uptake from various methods and recent time periods 249

13.1. Estimates of global ocean CO2 uptake variability 258

13.2. Cumulative ocean uptake of CO2 due to different climate-induced feedback effects 262

13.3. Biological effects on cumulative ocean uptake of CO2 265

13.4. Studies of THC slowdown under global warming scenarios 269

14.1. Estimates of global budget of anthropogenic carbon emissions, as reported by the IPCC Third Assessment Report 281

14.2. Global budget of anthropogenic carbon emissions for the 1980s using Houghton (1999) land use emissions estimates 283

14.3. Comparison of global budget of anthropogenic carbon emissions for the 1980s 284

14.4. Breakdown of the terrestrial carbon budget for the 1980s, based on the CCMLP simulations 287

18.1. Fluxes relevant to continental margins 343-344

21.1. SITC framework for national export and import 385

21.2. Selected agricultural and forest product trade data availability 385

21.3. Carbon exports and imports by continent for 2000 387

21.4. Volume and value of cereals, paper, and wood products exports by continent for 2000 388

21.5. Carbon exports from region to region for 2000 389

22.1. Estimates of potential global greenhouse gas emission reductions in 2010 and 2020 408-409

22.2. Estimates of potential global greenhouse gas emission reductions in 2010: Land use, land use change, and forestry 410

24.1. Major conferences on global climate change 433

25.1. Methane emissions, 1990 442

25.2. Potential sink enhancement in 2010 at a marginal cost of US$100 per ton of carbon 443

25.3. Anthropogenic nitrous oxide emissions, 1990 444

26.1. The amount of added iron (Fe) and the observed drawdown of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the mixed layer during three iron fertilization experiments 458

29.1. Global warming potentials (mass basis) for major greenhouse gases over different time periods 495

29.2. Annual fluxes of CH4 and N2O in carbon-equivalent units 496

29.3. Sources of greenhouse gas flux in agricultural and forest systems at a U.S. Midwest site 503

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