Greenland

In northern Greenland, the clothing of Inughuit (Polar Eskimo) men consisted of knee-high sealskin boots, polar bear skin trousers, and two parkas—the inner generally of bird skin with the feathers facing in, and the outer of sealskin with the hair facing out. The parkas were hip length and cut straight around the bottom. Warmer fox or caribou coats were worn in the winter. Women's garments consisted of parkas similar to the men's, but with larger hoods and roomier backs to accommodate a baby, short trousers of fox skin, and tall, stiff boots worn with caribou stockings edged with polar bear fur.

The Kalaallit, or West Greenlanders, generally wore parkas of sealskin, but also used bird, fox, and caribou. Men's garments reached almost to the knee and, after contact, had no flaps. Shorter jackets of gut were worn for kayaking. Women's parkas featured flaps in the front and back, larger hoods, and room at the back for carrying a child. Their trousers met their boots just below the knee.

Decoration consisted of linear bands of fur mosaic, appliqued gut attached with sinew, and, later, beads. Greenlandic parkas are distinguished by single hood roots in front, formed by joining extensions attached to the lower front edges of the hood. Beads, bands of sealskin, or dogskin trimmed hood openings. After contact with the Europeans, Greenlanders began using fabric to construct garments and lace and beads for trim. Contemporary Kalaallit clothing, worn for special occasions, consists of white anoraks for the men. Women wear tall skin stockings decorated at the top with lace and embroidery. Their boots are decorated with white skin strips that run up the front of the boots and split into a Y-shape just below the knee. They wear wide circular beaded collars that reach below their shoulders, almost to their waists.

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