Cm

Q 001 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 300 310 320 330 340

FIGURE 4.29 Absorption cross sections of acetone at 298 and 261 K (adapted from Hynes et al., 1992).

Q 001 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 300 310 320 330 340

FIGURE 4.29 Absorption cross sections of acetone at 298 and 261 K (adapted from Hynes et al., 1992).

FIGURE 4.30 Measured quantum yields for acetone photodissociation as a function of wavelength at 1 atm total pressure and extrapolated to zero total pressure (adapted from Gierczak et al., 1998).

250 300 350 400

FIGURE 4.30 Measured quantum yields for acetone photodissociation as a function of wavelength at 1 atm total pressure and extrapolated to zero total pressure (adapted from Gierczak et al., 1998).

250 300 350 400

FIGURE 4.32 Absorption spectra of C10N02 and Br0N02 at room temperature (based on data in DeMore et al., 1997, Burkholder et al., 1994, and Deters et al., 1998).

addition, as discussed in Chapter 6.A, there is an increasing recognition that since atomic chlorine and bromine may play key roles in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer, they may also be important in the troposphere.

Figure 4.32 shows the absorption spectra of these two nitrates at room temperature, and Table 4.28 summarizes the absorption cross sections (Burkholder et al., 1994, 1995; DeMore et al., 1997; Deters et al., 1998).

There are several feasible photolysis routes for these nitrates; e.g., for chlorine nitrate:

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