Chapter summary

This chapter attempts to deepen the discussion on knowledge production in international relations in general and the study of international environmental regimes in particular. It explores ways to analyze scientific activities, not as inputs to policy processes, but in their own right. Based on insights from science and technology studies, the analytical lens is that knowledge and political order are co-produced and that it is therefore of interest to understand how political order can influence knowledge production. The basic epistemological premise is that scientific knowledge is socially constructed, and that this process can be best understood as co-construction between nature and culture/society.

The chapter highlights the basic analytical tension between structure and agency. By combining it with the tension expressed by the idea of co-production of science and policy, a framework is created that should facilitate the analysis of how and when international regimes influence knowledge production. In addition, the chapter presents in more detail some analytical concepts that are used throughout the dissertation. They include the concepts fit, interplay, and scale from the study of institutional dimension of environmental change, and salience, legitimacy, and credibility from the study of global environmental assessments.

103 Young, The Institutional Dimensions of Environmental Change. Fit, Interplay, and Scale, 8.

104 Young, The Institutional Dimensions of Environmental Change. Fit, Interplay, and Scale, 23.

105 Young, The Institutional Dimensions of Environmental Change. Fit, Interplay, and Scale, 24.

106 Young, The Institutional Dimensions of Environmental Change. Fit, Interplay, and Scale, 113-115.

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