Homemade Organic Fertilizer Recipe

Fertilizers Home Made Formulas

In this information you will find recipes and techniques that work to: Protect your house and lawn with special indoor and outdoor Shock Treatments: Ants, Snails, Slugs, Roaches, Fleas, Earwigs, Cockroaches, Silverfish, Beetles, Termites and Webworms. Say good-bye to those annoying yellow spots. Learn the secret to keep your grass greener in water restricted areas and in hot weather. Treat your lawn with a deworming concoction. (learn how and why you must do it once a year) Use effective Natural Insecticides (it's now time to learn what they are and how to use them. in the years to come, only natural insecticides will be permitted by cities!) Avoid serious plant, pet and child health problems caused by toxic commercial products. Protect yourself and your family against the nile virus in 1 minute. Kill ants and destroy the entire colony in 3 days or less. Kill harmful insects while fertilizing your soils. Read more here...

Fertilizers Home Made Formulas Overview

Rating:

4.6 stars out of 11 votes

Contents: Ebook
Author: John Perez
Official Website: www.sunshine-4u.com
Price: $29.95

Access Now

My Fertilizers Home Made Formulas Review

Highly Recommended

This is one of the best e-books I have read on this field. The writing style was simple and engaging. Content included was worth reading spending my precious time.

If you want to purchase this e-book, you are just a click away. Click below and buy Fertilizers Home Made Formulas for a reduced price without any waste of time.

Changes In Animal Manure Management And Fertilizer

The changes in livestock production and land use portrayed above also have important repercussions for the production, management and use of animal manure and fertilizers. Bouwman et al. (2005b) distinguished large ruminants (dairy and non-dairy cattle, buffaloes), small ruminants (sheep and goats), pigs, poultry, horses, asses, mules and camels for calculating the animal manure N production. The approach for distributing of animal manure over the two production systems, and within each system over different animal manure Global total N inputs from fertilizers and production of animal manure in agricultural systems have almost doubled between 1970 and 1995 from about 114 Tg yr to 188 Tg yr, whereby N manure contributed 83 Tg yr or about 73 in 1970 and 104 Tg yr (55 ) in 1995. Bouwman et al. (2005b) estimated a total N input from fertilizers and animal manure of 238 Tg yr, animal manure N being 127 Tg yr (53 ) and N fertilizer 110 Tg yr (estimate for 2030) (Table 5.3).

Categorization in Phosphate Fertilizer Production

The fertilizer industry comprises nitrogen-based, phosphate-based, and potassium-based fertilizer manufacturing, as well as combinations of these nutrients in mixed and blend fertilizer formulations. Only the phosphate-based fertilizer industry is discussed here and, therefore, the categorization mainly involves two broad divisions (a) the phosphate fertilizer industry (A) and (b) the mixed and blend fertilizer industry (G) in which one of the components is a phosphate compound. The following categorization system of the various separate processes and their production streams and descriptions is taken from the federal guidelines 8 pertaining to state and local industrial pretreatment programs. It will be used in the discussion that ensues to identify process flows and characterize the resulting raw waste. Figure 7 shows a flow diagram for the production streams of the entire phosphate and nitrogen fertilizer manufacturing industry.

Mixed and Blend Fertilizer G

The raw materials used to produce mixed fertilizers include inorganic acids, solutions, double nutrient fertilizers, and all types of straight fertilizers. The choice of raw materials depends on the specific nitrogen, phosphate, potassium (N-P-K) formulation to be produced and on the cost of the different materials from which they can be made. The mixed fertilizer process involves the controlled addition of both dry and liquid raw materials to a granulator, which is normally a rotary drum, but pug mills are also used. Raw materials, plus some recycled product material, are mixed to form an essentially homogeneous granular product. Wet granules from the granulator are discharged into a rotary drier, where the excess water is evaporated and dried granules from the drier are then sized on vibrating screens. Over- and undersized granules are separated for use as recycle material in the granulator. Commercial-product-size granules are cooled and then conveyed to storage...

Table 6 Raw Wastewater Characteristics of Phosphate Fertilizer Industry Retention Ponds

Considerable variation, therefore, is observed in quantities and wastewater characteristics at different plants. According to a UNIDO report 34 , the most important factors that contribute to excessive in-plant materials losses and, therefore, probable subsequent pollution are the age of the facilities (low efficiency, poor process control), the state of maintenance and repair (especially of control equipment), variations in feedstock and difficulties in adjusting processes to cope, and an operational management philosophy such as consideration for pollution control and prevention of materials loss. Because of process cooling requirements, fertilizer manufacturing facilities may have an overall large water demand, with the wastewater effluent discharge largely dependent on the extent of in-plant recirculation 17 . Facilities designed on

Table 10 Effluent Limitations mgL for Subpart A Phosphate Fertilizer

Produce NPK grades in varying proportions 22 . According to Subpart O, mixed fertilizer means a mixture of wet and or dry straight fertilizer materials, mixed fertilizer materials, fillers, and additives prepared through chemical reaction to a given formulation, whereas blend fertilizer means a mixture of dry, straight, and mixed fertilizer materials. The effluent limitations guidelines for BPT, BCT, and BAT, and the standards of performance for new sources, allow no discharge of process wastewater pollutants to navigable waters. Finally, the pretreatment standards establishing the quantity of pollutants that may be discharged to publicly owned treatment works (POTW) by a new source are given in Table 11.

Increasing fertilizer use

Currently, fertilizer-N use efficiency by agricultural crops is estimated to be approximately 50 per cent (Smil, 1999 Howarth et al, 2002 Ladha et al, 2005). In other words, on average half of the amount of the fertilizer-N applied cannot be recovered in the crop or in the soil and has to be considered to have been lost from the cropping system. Denitrification (N2O and N2), volatilization (NH3) and leaching (NO3) are the major pathways of N losses (Schlesinger, 1997 Mosier et al, 2001), causing a cascade of environmental and human health problems (Galloway et al, 2003). Therefore there is the potential for major improvements in N use efficiency through adopting fertilizer, soil water and crop management practices that focus on maximizing crop N uptake, with minimum N fertilizer losses and the optimum use of indigenous soil N (Ladha et al, 2005). Through optimizing N use efficiency, a total reduction in N2O emissions will be achieved as well as a further reduction in N2O emissions per...

Optimizing fertilizer application with respect to nitrous oxide emission

Emissions of N2O from agricultural systems will not decrease to zero when no N fertilizer is applied, but will remain at some background level, as in any non-agricultural system. For example, when 383 non-manured, non-N-fertilized cropping systems were evaluated for N2O emissions, the average background emission was estimated at 0.55kg N2O ha-1 (Helgason et al, 2005). Natural N deposition and biological fixation, and N mineralization from soil organic Table 5.2 Global estimates of manure-N excretion in animal houses and storage systems and excretion during grazing, spreading of stored manure in cropland and grassland, and N fertilizer use in cropland and grassland for the year 2000 Table 5.2 Global estimates of manure-N excretion in animal houses and storage systems and excretion during grazing, spreading of stored manure in cropland and grassland, and N fertilizer use in cropland and grassland for the year 2000 N fertilizer use Agricultural systems serve for the production of food,...

Phosphate Fertilizer A

H2so4 Rady Flow Chart

The phosphate fertilizer industry is defined as eight separate processes phosphate rock grinding, wet process phosphoric acid, phosphoric acid concentration, phosphoric acid clarification, normal superphosphate, triple superphosphate, ammonium phosphate, and sulfuric acid. Practically all phosphate manufacturers combine the various effluents into a large recycle water system. It is only when the quantity of recycle water increases beyond the capacity to contain it that effluent treatment is necessary. Wet Process Phosphoric Acid. A production process flow diagram is shown in Figure 8. Insoluble phosphate rock is changed to water-soluble phosphoric acid by solubilizing the phosphate rock with an acid, generally sulfuric or nitric. The phosphoric acid produced from the nitric acid process is blended with other ingredients to produce a fertilizer, whereas the phosphoric acid produced from the sulfuric acid process must be concentrated before further use. Minor quantities of fluorine,...

Use as Fertilizer Soil Conditioner

OMWW contains a high organic load, substantial amounts of plant nutrients (3.5-11 g l of K2O, 0.06-2 g l of P2O5, and 0.15-0.5 g l of MgO) and is a low cost source of water, all of which favor its use as a soil fertilizer or organic amendment to the poor soils that abound so much in the countries where it originates (Cegarra J. et al., 1966a,b Catalano L. and Felice M. de, 1989 Nunes J.M. et al., 2001). Direct application of OMWW to soil has been considered as an inexpensive method of disposal and recovery of their mineral and organic components (Di Giovacchino L. et al., 1990, 1996, 2001, 2002) see Chapter 8 ''Biological processes'', section ''Irrigation of agricultural land Land spreading''. The amurca of the ancients was recommended as a fertilizer for olive trees (Cato, XCIII), vines, and fruit trees (Columella, XI, 2 ''Geoponika''29, II, 10), although these latter sources suggested that amurca used for this purpose must be free from salt. However, the use of OMWW as a fertilizer...

Phosphate Fertilizer Industry in Eastern Europe

Koziorowski and Kucharski 18 presented a survey of fertilizer industry experience in Eastern European countries and compared it with the United States and Western European equivalents. For instance, they stated that HF and silicofluoric acid are evolved during the process of In Czechoslovakian phosphate fertilizer plants, the superphosphate production waste-waters are further treated by neutralization on crushed limestone beds contained in special tanks that are followed by settling tanks for clarification of the wastewater. The beds have from three to five layers (with a minimum bed height of 0.35-1.60 m), treat a range of acidity of wastes from 438 to 890 meq L, and are designed for a hydraulic load ranging from 0.13 to 0.52 cm3 cm2 s (1.9-7.7 gpm ft2) at operating temperatures of 20-28 C. This experience agrees with results reported from Polish plants, the limestone used contains 56 CaO, and it was found in practice that coarse particles of 3-5 mm give better results because less...

Phosphoric Acid and NPK Fertilizer Plant

According to the literature 3,17,33 , the heterogeneous nature of fertilizer production plants precludes the possibility of presenting a typical case study of such a facility. Nevertheless, the wastewater flows, the characteristics, and the treatment systems for a phosphoric acid and N-P-K fertilizer plant were parts of a large fertilizer manufacturing facility. The full facility additionally included an ammonia plant, a urea plant, a sulfuric acid plant, and a nitric acid plant. The typical effluent flows were 183 m3 hour (806 gpm) from the phosphoric plant and 4.4 m3 hour (20 gpm) from the water treatment plant associated with it, whereas in the N-P-K plant they were 420 m3 hour (1850 gpm) from the barometric condenser and 108 m3 hour (476 gpm) from other effluent sources.

Ammonium Phosphate Fertilizer and Phosphoric Acid Plant

The fertilizer industry is plagued with a tremendous problem concerning waste disposal and dust because of the very nature of production that involves large volumes of dusty material. Jones and Olmsted 16 described the waste disposal problems and pollution control efforts at such a plant, Northwest Cooperative Mills, in St. Saul, Minnesota. Two types of problems are associated with waste from the manufacture of ammonium phosphate wastes from combining ammonia and phosphoric acid and the subsequent drying and cooling of the products, and wastes from the handling of the finished product arising primarily from the bagging of the product prior to shipping. Because the ammonia process has to be forced by introducing excess amounts of ammonia than the phosphoric acid is capable of absorbing, there is high ammonia content in the exhaust air stream from the ammoniator. Because it is neither economically sound nor environmentally acceptable to exhaust this to the atmosphere, an acid scrubber...

Structure Of The Guidelines

Secondly, the 2006 IPCC Guidelines present Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use in a single volume, rather than two volumes comprising Agriculture, on the one hand, and Land-use Change and Forestry on the other. This allows for better integration of information on the pattern of land use and should facilitate more consistent use of activity data (for example, fertilizer application), that affects both agriculture and other land uses, thus reducing or avoiding the possibilities for double counting or omission.

Agricultural impacts of climate change

Soil dynamics will also be affected by changing temperature regimes. Rising temperatures will increase the rate at which organic material decomposes and possibly decrease the level of moisture in soils. This will lower soil productivity, thus prompting the increased use of fertilizers. This might be mitigated, though, by the growing presence of nitrogen oxides that are also increasing as a result of fossil fuel combustion. Increased temperatures might also accelerate soil erosion in agricultural areas, rising temperatures increase the severity of thunderstorms. Without appropriate adaptation by producers, soil erosion could accelerate as the increased flow and force of water droplets dislodge soil. This is a problem because soil erosion is itself a cause of carbon dioxide release into the atmosphere.

Contributions To Climate Change

However, the impact of swidden agriculture is small compared to the destruction of tropical and temperate rainforests for the purposes of agriculture and timber production. Brazil is effectively competing with the United States in soybean production by turning its forests into fields. By turning its rainforests into cropland, Brazil is increasing greenhouse gases through deforestation. It also contributes to greenhouse gases because it has heavily invested in the American model of industrial agriculture, which relies on the consumption of fossil fuels to power farm equipment and to manufacture fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. While it is easy to blame tropical countries for cutting down their forests to make way for farming, temperate countries in North America and Europe have also plowed under biodiverse prairies and cut down broadleaf forests to make way for agriculture. The United States has the most productive agricultural system in the world. This productivity comes at a...

Agricultural Solutions To Climate Change

Livestock producers can reduce the impact of their operations by changing how they manage animal waste such as methane and manure. Some farmers are experimenting with anaerobic digesters that convert manure into more manageable waste solids that can be used as an organic fertilizer. The digester also creates methane as a byproduct, which can be captured and used as a renewable fuel.

Komamine T Fujimura and K N Watanabe

The other is that all life on this small planet will be jeopardized by destruction of environments caused by pollution, global warming and desertification of lands. Such global disruptions would happen in the course of increased industrial production for raising the standard of living, and excessive use of fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides for promotion of crop production.

Tsujii Introduction

A green revolution in rice and wheat that is based on intensification in modern inputs such as fertilizers, chemicals, agricultural machinery and irrigation water increased, on one hand, production of these grains in the world to reduce the huge number of world hungry. But, on the other hand, it destroyed natural environment and overused natural resources. Population explosion and income growth in the developing countries will cause an explosion of grain demand. This may lead to severe environmental destruction and exhaustion of natural resources if the demand is met by growth of grain production based

Foreword to the Second Edition

In the first edition titled Olive-Mill Waste Management'' emphasis was given to olive-mill waste. In the second edition, the original title has been modified to encompass all types of by-products generated during olive tree cultivation and olive fruit processing. In the case of olive tree cultivation, information is presented referring to pruning and harvest residues but does not include wasted fertilizers, herbicides, and insecticides which constitute a subject matter of their own. In the case of olive processing, information is presented referring to olive-milling waste-waters, solid, gaseous and energy wastes, and table olive processing wastewaters. In addition, information has been included concerning the management of used olive oil from cooking or other activities. Literature references and patents published or located since the first edition have been examined and incorporated where appropriate.

How Can We Stop The Degradation Of The Oceans

Heavily subsidized overuse of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, poor soil management practices, and unregulated animal production systems are the major sources of excess nitrogen and other nutrients in the environment that fuel coastal eutrophication (Jackson et al., 2001 Rabalais et al., 2007 Turner et al., 2008) and severely degrade terrestrial ecosystems (Tilman et al, 2002 Clay, 2004 Galloway et al, 2004 Dale and Polasky, 2007). Manufacture of chemical fertilizers also consumes huge amounts of energy from natural gas (Howarth, 2004). Removal of subsidies and taxation of fertilizers would significantly reduce nutrient loading, eutro-phication, and emissions of greenhouse gases with only modest decreases in food production and increased costs.

What is producing nitrous oxide in soil

Soil microbial N2O production occurs via nitrification (ammonia oxidation) and nitrate dissimilation (denitrification and nitrate ammonification) pathways (Figure 2.1). These processes rarely occur in isolation, with possible competition for substrates under near-limiting conditions, and the possibility of transfer of N2O or intermediary products from one process to another depending on prevailing environmental conditions, microbial community structure and location within the soil matrix. This means that N2O produced during several processes may form one pool before being reduced to N2 during denitrification. This representation of biological pathways of N2O production reflects fairly recent advances in understanding until the 1980s N2O emissions in terrestrial systems were solely attributed to denitrification. Whilst denitrification may often be the predominant source of N2O, particularly following rainfall events or application of NO3 -based fertilizers to moist soil, these are not...

What Is The Principal Cause Of The Present Extinction Spasm

Human activities are associated directly or indirectly with nearly every aspect of the current extinction spasm. The sheer magnitude of the human population has profound implications because of the demands placed on the environment. Population growth, which has increased so dramatically since industrialization, is connected to nearly every aspect of the current extinction event. Amphibians may be taken as a case study for terrestrial organisms. They have been severely impacted by habitat modification and destruction, which frequently has been accompanied by use of fertilizers and pesticides (Hayes et al., 2002). In addition, many other pollutants that have negative effects on amphibians are byproducts of human activities. Humans have been direct or indirect agents for the introduction of exotic organisms. Furthermore, with the expansion of human populations into

Fossil Fuel Use in Agriculture

Energy is required for all agricultural operations. Modern intensive agriculture requires much more energy input than did traditional farming methods, since it relies on the use of fossil fuels for tillage, transportation and grain drying, for the manufacture of fertilizers, pesticides and equipment used as agricultural inputs, and for generating electricity used on farms (Frye, 1984). Early estimates suggested that fossil fuel usage by agriculture, primarily of liquid fuels and electricity, constitute only 3-4 of the total consumption in developed countries (CAST, 1992 Enqu te Commission, 1995). To provide a reference for agriculture's contribution, C emissions from fossil fuel use in the USA in 1996 were reported to be 286.7, 229.9, 477.5 and 445.5 MMTCE for residential, commercial, industrial and transportation sectors, respectively (EPA, 1998). The total amount of C emitted as CO2 in the USA in 1996 from fossil fuels was 1450.3 MMTCE, a value that has steadily increased with time....

Sustainable Versus Organic Agriculture

Abstract Awareness and concern for problems related to environmental quality are growing at a steady pace climate change, biodiversity, soil fertility decay and above all food quality and pollution are everyday subjects for debates and discussions. The complexity of the problems and the uncertainty about many basic data quite often make discussions inconclusive even indications issued by scientific authorities are sometimes misleading, and the problems are exacerbated by the frequent influence of ideological positions. In an endeavour to contribute to clarify agriculture-related environmental issues, a review is made here of the principles of sustainable agriculture and of the ways to deal with them. The need is emphasized for a system approach which is able to reconcile economic-productive, environmental and social aspects, the three 'pillars' of sustainability, permitting to consider simultaneously the numerous factors concurring to determine the most appropriate production...

Introduction 311 The Problem

It has been reported that in the UK the 'external costs' of agriculture in 1996 amounted to a staggering 89 of the average net farm income (Pretty et al. 2000), that annual damage by pesticides and fertilizers to water quality is suspected to range in the billions of dollars (Doran et al. 1996) and that annual off-site damages from soil erosion by water in the USA are over US 7 billion (Pimentel et al. 1993). Integrated farming, for instance, developed by the EISA, a group of six European organizations, is based on a set of sound, sensible rules judiciously adopting some principles of organic farming, integrating them when they are insufficiently restrictive, e.g. when the need to save energy or protecting the soil is not sufficiently considered, and relaxing them when unreasonably restrictive, e.g. when they totally ban synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. EISA released a Common Codex for Integrated Farming which considers aspects of food production, economic viability, producer and...

Potential Impacts of Climate Change

Climate change may lead to an intensification of the global hydrological cycle and can have major impacts on regional water resources. Reduced rainfall and increased evaporation in a warmer world could dramatically reduce runoff in some areas, significantly decreasing the availability of water resources for crop irrigation, hydroelectric power production, and industrial commercial and transport uses. Other regions may see increased rainfall. In light of the increase in artificial fertilizers, pesticides, feedlots excrement, and hazardous waste dumps, the provision of good quality drinking water is anticipated to be difficult.

Evaluating the scale of crop failure

After the mid-1960s, the emphasis was placed on the intensification of cereal production. From 1900 to 1950, average cereal yields reached only 0.6 to 0.8 tons per hectare. Nor was there any further increase in the early 1960s. Then, starting from 1965, a considerable growth in cereal production can be observed. During that decade (1965 to 1975) the average yield in cereals increased from 1 to 1.5 tons per hectare, that is, by 50 percent. This progress was mainly due to the large-scale application of mineral fertilizers in Soviet agriculture during the period. After 1980, however, there was a stagnation in cereal productivity in Russia, although state investment in agriculture continued to grow.

Mitigation Options for Agriculture

N fertilizer efficiency, achieving higher yield per unit land area and using conservation tillage hold the most promise for indirectly mitigating N2O and CO2 emissions. Mitigation of CH4 emissions from agriculture will require improved diets and rations for animals, aerobic conditions in manure management and improved rice production. Practices that will have the most impact on GHGs from rice production are water and carbon management, soil and variety selection, fertilizer type and amount, and soil preparation. Global understanding of these critical management practices will lead to enhanced soil and plant management and the development of new technologies that result in increased food production efficiency with minimum impact on environmental quality and GHGs. Acceptance of mitigation options will depend on the extent to which sustainable agricultural production can be achieved and the combined social, economic and environmental benefits.

Integrated Nutrient Management

Food deficient in mineral nutrients decreases the IQ of children by 10 points. The potentiating effect of protein-, energy-, mineral nutrient-deficient cereal food may adversely affect about half the population in south Asia. Therefore, promotion of nutrient management through IPNS is an important component of the Indian strategy for food and nutritional security. In the quest for greater productivity, we have a responsibility to promote the use of fertilizers, organics including farm wastes, crop residues, green manure and urban city composts and microbial inoculant to bridge the demand supply gap of mineral nutrients. The nutrient gap has to be met by enhancing the input use efficiency through development of integrated nutrient management systems for harnessing the positive interactions of crops with growth factors in major production systems in different agro-ecological regions. In fertilizer consumption statistics, a matter of serious concern is the widening N P K fertilizer use...

Future of Public Research

At the heart of the problem has been the growing separation between research and development in the public sector. While there is still considerable publicly funded research, the capacity of public sector institutions to deliver technology to farmers has atrophied considerably over the past 30 years. In the interest of efficiency, public sector production organizations (such as agricultural extension, seed and fertilizer suppliers, and grain marketing boards) have been greatly reduced or eliminated. The theory, often called the Washington Consensus, calls for market-led development, and a shrinking role for the public sector in economic activities. International trade and the private sector have been identified as the engines of economic growth. While the logic seems compelling, market-led development has also led to a growing vacuum between publicly funded technology generation and the technology delivery dimension. National and international research organizations are producing...

Humaninduced Changes And Their Effects On Biodiversity And Ecosystem Function

Acid deposition There is a huge literature on the effects of acid deposition on the growth and species composition of strands at the southern boundary of the boreal forest, particularly downwind from industrial areas (e.g. Drablos and Tollan 1980 Binkley et al. 1989 Malanchuk and Nilsson 1989 Schulze et al. 1989). The trends are not entirely clear, particularly with regard to diversity, although dieback of conifers, especially at high altitudes continuously bathed in acid fog, appears to be common. Even less clear are the mechanisms (Manion and Lachance 1992). Research has centered on the role of nitric acid in determining forest response. Nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient to productivity in boreal forests (Weetman 1968 Van Cleve and Oliver 1982) and it is possible that dieback could simply be a symptom of nitrogen deficiency induced by the slow decay of spruce litter, leading to spruce being replaced by birch (Pastor et al. 1987). On the other hand, the nitrogen in acid...

Good housekeeping recommendations for specific industries to reduce waste

The principal steps in processing livestock include (1) rendering and bleeding (2) scalding and or skin removal (3) internal organ evisceration (4) washing, chilling, and cooling (5) packaging and (6) clean-up (US-AEP 1997). Waste includes carcasses, hides, hoofs, heads, feathers, manure, offal, viscera, bones, fat and meat trimmings, blood and other fluids, and off-spec animals and meat. There are several options for reducing this waste. Install strainers along evisceration lines to keep byproducts off the floor. Attach strainers to drains in the de-hairing process area. Send blood to a blood collection facility. Remove fat from conveyor belts by scraping rather than spraying. Before washing areas, collect solids with squeegees, brooms, or shovels. Waste reuse and recycling options include animal and pet food, composting or vermicomposting of paunch manure, fertilizers, cosmetics, blood meal, gelatin from heads, and glue from hides.

Food Availability and Climate Change

Furthermore, expanding cropped area, which is the alternative to increasing yield, is either difficult or unappealing throughout much of the world, either because of urban encroachment on agricultural land or because of the environmental costs of bringing new land into production. The FAO, which periodically assesses trends in crop demand and supply, envisages a significant expansion of cropland area in Africa and Latin America but little growth elsewhere, mainly because so little land in Asia remains uncultivated (Bruinsma 2003). Overall, most global assessments project that (1) crop demand will grow considerably over the next few decades, given the additive pressures of population growth (estimated to peak at 9.1 billion mid-century), higher incomes resulting in shifting food preferences, and potential development of large-scale biofuel production and the additional crop demand it represents (2) the rate of demand growth, however, will be slower than observed in the past few...

Opportunities for mitigation

One of the main aims of determining the microbial sources of N2O is to provide a scientific basis for more targeted mitigation strategies. Data on the environmental regulation of N2O production during the different microbial processes are scarce, particularly for nitrifier denitrification and nitrate ammonification. More effort needs now to be placed on considering all potential sources of N2O when measuring and interpreting N2O fluxes from different environments and under different management regimes. Richardson et al (2009) argue that understanding the regulation of the denitrifier N2O reductase is central to the development of management options to lower net N2O emissions by enhancing its reduction to N2, rather than trying to eliminate denitrification. They consider the effect on the regulation of the N2O reductase of management options such as application of nitrogenous or copper fertilizer to regulate Cu availability for this Cu-based enzyme, soil organic matter (SOM) management...

Trade and Commerce Connections

Embodied carbon represents the carbon that resides directly within the product itself (for cereals, wood, and paper, about half of the final weight is carbon). In addition to embodied carbon, at least two other components are usually excluded from estimates of carbon content in international trade. One is the production carbon, which comprises the inputs required to produce a final product, primarily energy-related consumption to provide inputs (e.g., pesticides, fertilizers) and processing (e.g., machinery for harvesting, milling, sawing). A second element is the transport carbon, which represents the energy costs of transporting the processed products to a final destination. Countries that use intensive production systems and engage in significant exports (pri

Limited Use of New Technologies

The only option to sustain production growth is to increase yields. Within the developing world, average regional grain yields are the highest in North Africa, and the lowest in Sub-Saharan Africa. Yields are highly dependent on the use of additives, particularly fertilizers. The principal factor limiting yield response to fertilizer use is the inadequate supply of water during the growing season. Although water availability varies considerably across regions, it has been a serious problem in many countries. According to World Bank studies, depletion and degradation of water resources have become major problems facing many low-income countries (Crosson and Anderson, 1992 Cleaver and Schreiber, 1994). Within 10 years, if the population grows at projected rates, per capita water availability will decrease by an average 20 in developing countries, and by 34 in African countries. The agricultural The sparse rainfall that characterizes much of Sub-Saharan Africa affects the response to and...

Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Food Security

Higher levels of CO2 in the atmosphere tend to increase plant growth. However, increases in agricultural productivity due to this fertilization effect will vary considerably from one location to another. First, some crops benefit more than other crops. The response of maize, millet, sorghum, and sugarcane (known as C4 crops) to increases in atmospheric CO2, for example, is expected to be relatively small compared to other crops (Kirschbaum et al., 1996). Also, crop responses to atmospheric CO2 are positively correlated with the level of nutrients available. If nutrients are limited, the response is negligible (Acock and Allen, 1985). Hence, productivity increases are likely to be smaller in low-income countries that rely heavily on C4 crops and where the availability of fertilizers is a limiting factor in agricultural production.

Effects of [CO2 and temperature on crop development

It is difficult to disentangle with certainty direct (as CO2 per se) and indirect (temperature increases due to smaller gs) effects of CO2 on crop development. However, there is little evidence of any direct CO2 effect on the rate of development in wheat at any stage. Slightly faster rates of leaf, ear, spike and tiller development are frequently observed in wheat grown at elevated CO2 and are probably indirect. The complete absence of an effect of elevated CO2 on wheat phenology in conditions of relatively low radiation also supports this conclusion (Mitchell et al., 1995 Batts etal., 1996, 1997 Wheeler et al., 1996b). In the FACE experiments, N fertilizer altered crop architecture (Brooks et al., 1996), but elevated CO2 had a minimal effect on rates of overall canopy development and senescence (Wall et al., 1997). This was in contrast to accelerated development seen in earlier studies when temperatures differed (Garcia et al., 1998). This emphasizes the great importance of small...

Effects of [CO2 on biomass and grain yield

Biomass results from accumulation of carbon in plant products as the difference between photosynthesis and respiration, plus accumulation of minerals. Increasing biomass might, therefore, be expected to parallel stimulation of instantaneous Pn. However, in practice there are many complicating factors for example, stimulation of root or canopy growth may allow additional resource capture. Conversely, increased C assimilation may result in nutrients being more limiting for growth, thus necessitating increased fertilizer applications, which may increase lodging and disease. At low temperatures, wheat growth is probably not limited by assimilation, but rather by sink capacity. These factors may explain the increases in wheat biomass that range from 0 to 40 in response to doubling CO2 . Early field studies (reviewed in Lawlor and Mitchell, 1991) indicated responses ranging from 30 increase for a doubling of CO2 to only a 20 increase for a quadrupling of CO2 . Biomass of winter wheat in...

Carbon Pricing and Industry Exposure

Energy-intensity13' and trade-intensity14' are useful indicators for analyzing industry exposure to carbon pricing. Figure 2.1 examines the intensity indicators for a select number of industries in the USA. The figure illustrates that while some sectors such as lime face high energy consumption, the relatively low trade intensity limits exposure to carbon price absorption. Conversely, other sectors which are both energy and trade intensive, such as nitrogenous fertilizers, experience the highest exposure to climate policy measures. Based on this high-level analysis, the basic chemical industry is one of the most exposed sectors, considering the relatively high level of energy and trade intensity compared with other sectors.

Modifying Food Production Systems Could Potentially Help Limit the Magnitude of Future Climate Change

Food production systems are not only affected by climate change they also contribute to it through GHG emissions of CO2, CH4 (primarily from livestock and flooded rice paddies), and N2O (primarily from fertilizer use). Recent global assessments conclude that agriculture accounts for about 10 to 12 percent of total global human emissions of GHGs. With the intensification of agriculture that will be required to feed the world's growing and increasingly affluent population, these emissions are projected to increase. Many options are available to manage agricultural and livestock systems to reduce emissions, such as changes in feed and feeding practices, manure management, and more efficient fertilizer application. At a landscape level, management of agricultural lands presents opportunities to reduce atmospheric concentrations of CO2 by sequestering soil carbon, shifting to crops with higher carbon storage potential, and reducing forest clearing for agricultural expansion. Neither the...

Opportunities within a Compliance Market

Emissions trading can also offer provisions for companies to voluntarily enter facilities into the scheme referred to as 'opt-in' to undertake measures that reduce emissions and sell surplus allowances from the facility. The opt-in rule in the EU ETS allowed France and the Netherlands to include N2O emissions from fertilizers as of 2008 23 .

Soil Microbial Biomass

Field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that soil microbial activity can create soil conditions favourable to sustainable production (Andrade et al. 1998). Bolton et al. (1985) found that microbial activity and microbial biomass were higher under organic management systems. Soil microbial communities are strongly influenced by agricultural practices. Many farming practices such as intensive tillage, application of chemical pesticides and mineral fertilizers and monoculture are directly or indirectly harmful to soil microbes. Microbial population density and diversity are affected by the level of organic matter, which provides energy for soil micro-organisms. Peacock et al. (2001) reported that soil management practices that result in differential carbon inputs also affect the size and structural community of soil biomass. One such practice is the use of organic amendments and cover crops, which increase carbon availability to micro-organisms. Non-pathogenic and plant growth...

Its Start and Impacts

There were some experiences in varietal improvement in many countries in Asia. There was a strong motivation for intensive agriculture following the model of the countries in the Far East, where land reform was successful and recovered heavy industries were able to provide sufficient chemical fertilizers. Then, the new plant type was further improved through breeding programs into the release of IR 8 from IRRI in 1967. The improved type was characterized by a single gene for semi-dwarfism, sd-1, which is a basis for the short stature and improved response to increased fertilizer application. This type performed best with a combination of increased fertilizers under irrigation. Similar approaches were adopted in other crops like wheat.

Extreme temperatures including heat waves and cold waves

Changes in crops, growing periods, planting dates, varieties, irrigation and fertilizers as well as crop diversification, intercropping, growing off-season crops and preference for the more resistant traditional varieties are some of the farm level mitigations possible (e.g. Gommes and N gre 1992) together with microclimate management and manipulation (Stigter et al. 1992 Stigter 1994). tte very likely higher maximum temperatures, more hot days and heat waves over nearly all land area will also give increased heat stress in livestock and wildlife (Zhao Yanxia et al. 2005) for which shade and other protection facilities will have to be expanded.

Making Agriculture and Land Use Climatefriendly and Climateresilient

An agricultural landscape should simultaneously provide food and fiber, meet the needs ofnature and biodiversity, and support viable livelihoods for people who live there. In terms of climate change, landscape and farming systems should actively absorb and store carbon in vegetation and soils, reduce emissions of methane from rice production, livestock, and burning, and reduce nitrous oxide emissions from inorganic fertilizers. At the same time, it is important to increase the resilience of production systems and ecosystem services to climate change.8 Rotational grazing minimizes livestock impacts biogas digesters turn waste into energy and organic fertilizer. Rotational grazing minimizes livestock impacts biogas digesters turn waste into energy and organic fertilizer.

Framework for Evaluation of Adaptation Measures

The state and decision indicators are related to each other. If a state indicator changes (thus the water system of a river changes), the decision indicator will also change, and hence can imply that a certain objective cannot be met. Or, the other way around. When, for example, the goal is to bring a certain fish species like the salmon back into the river, the following steps have to be taken. First the current state of the water resources system has to be assessed. For instance, the concentration of fertilizer in the water and the absence of spring floods are the limiting factors for the return of the salmon. These limiting factors can be found through the indicators we assigned to measure the state of the WRS. The next step is to design and implement measures to improve the status of water resources. Such measures could be to reduce cropland near the river and to change reservoir management by allowing more spring floods. The effectiveness of such measure is evaluated through the...

Allocating for the Chemical Industry

Full auctioning of allowances is criticized by manufacturing industries but is particularly disadvantageous for some sectors of the chemical industry such as PVC, nitrogenous fertilizer, and soda ash producers, as demonstrated earlier in the chapter. Industry suggests that this approach does not drive market efficiency

Availability Really Limit Moist Tropical Forest Productivity

This conclusion is based, at least in part, on the observation that forests on older soils show increased growth in response to phosphorus but not to nitrogen fertilization (Herbert and Fownes, 1995). But at the individual plant level, it is also often observed that climax-tree species native to both moist and dry tropical forests may show little if any growth response to increased soil phosphorus availability (Rincon and Huante, 1994 Huante et al, 1995 Raaimakers and Lambers, 1996 Veenendaal et al, 1996). Thus, as was discussed in Sec. 3.2, it may actually be that most plants adapted to low-phosphorus tropical forest soils, while having adaptions to such soils such as lower inherent growth rates and higher root-shoot ratios may not be able to substantially increase that growth in response to higher phosphorus levels (Veenendaal et al, 1996). In this context, one can still regard the low productivity of some tropical forests as being a consequence of low nutrient availability, but...

Environmental Adaptation Measures

For the Syr Darya, the largest environmental problems correlate with the main activity in the basin, agriculture, and are partly caused by the way the water resources are managed (Savoskul et al., 2003). Agriculture pollutes the water with pesticides, herbicides, insecticides and mineral fertilizers. Furthermore, the agricultural use of water is so high that the inflow to the Aral Sea has decreased drastically and the sea level is dropping, which has led to the collapse of ecosystems in the Aral Sea region since the 1960s. Besides the current pressures on the system, climate change will also impose additional pressures on the system in the future. These pressures are called exogenous influences in the framework, because they cannot be influenced by actions in the basin. Other exogenous influences are population growth and economic growth. For the Syr Darya it is expected that under climate change the runoff peak in spring will Fertilizer The concentration of P or N in water is an...

Creating Highcarbon Cropping Systems

Currently two thirds of all arable land is used to grow annual grains. This production depends on tilling, preparing seed beds, and applying chemical inputs. Every year the process starts over again from scratch. This makes production more dependent on chemical inputs, which also require a lot of fossil fuels to produce. Furthermore, excessive application of nitrogen fertilizer is a major source of nitrous oxide emissions, as noted earlier.22 In contrast, perennial grasses retain a strong root network between growing seasons. Hence, a good amount of the living biomass remains in the soil instead of being released as greenhouse gases. And they help hold soil organic matter and water together, reducing soil erosion and GHG emissions. Finally, the perennial nature of these grasses does away with the need for annual tilling that releases GHGs and causes soil erosion, and it also makes the grasses more conservative in the use of nutrients. In one U.S. case, for example,...

Managing The Carbon Cycle

Implementation of reduced and conservation-oriented tillage practices in agriculture appears to offer a consistent net benefit by enhancing soil carbon storage (Kern & Johnson, 1993 Robertson, Paul, & Harwood, 2000 West & Marland, 2002) however, greater use of N fertilizer often does not (Schlesinger, 2000 but see West & Marland, 2003). The release of CO2 by using fossil fuels to pump irrigation water also greatly exceeds the enhanced carbon storage found in irrigated agricultural soils (Schlesinger, 2000). Wildly positive forecasts (e.g., 0.4-0.8 Pg C year) have been made for the potential to increase carbon storage in agricultural soils (Lal, 2001), but reality is not nearly so sanguine. Pacala et al. (2001) estimate that the carbon storage in cropland soils of the U.S. was only 0-0.04 Pg C year during the 1980s. Ogle, Bredt, Eve, Paustian (2003) suggest a net increase of 0.0013 Pg C year in agricultural soils due to land use change and improved management between 1982...

Soil Carbon Sequestration Options

For forests, carbon sequestration options include the increase of soil carbon stocks through afforestation, reforestation, improved forest management or revegetation. For croplands, options include zero or reduced tillage, set-aside or Conservation Reserve Program, conversion to permanent or deep-rooting crops, improved efficiency of animal manure use, improved efficiency of crop residue use, agricultural use of sewage sludge, application of compost to land, rotational changes, fertilizer use, irrigation, bioenergy crops, extensification or de-intensification of farming, organic farming (a combination of many different individual practices), conversion of cropland to grassland and management to reduce wind and water erosion. For grazing lands, soil carbon sequestration measures include improved efficiency of animal manure use, improved efficiency of crop residue use, improved livestock management to reduce soil disturbance, improved livestock management to maximize manure carbon...

Biodiesel and bioethanol

The picture is even more pronounced when you look at the net energy balance - when you take into account the amount of energy necessary to obtain the energy stored in bioenergy. Today, biogas from silage maize, Sudan grass and other productive energy plants already produces a net energy yield of 42,000 to 62,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) per hectare. In contrast, BTL can only produce around 33,600kWh. The energy-intensive process of distilling bioethanol from whatever source generally produces an even less impressive net energy yield, depending upon the kind of energy input. In terms of carbon dioxide saving costs, biogas is the most favourable of all biofuels. In addition, second-generation biofuels are produced by transforming biomass in a high temperature (energy-intensive) chemical industrial process into liquid fuels. This does not allow for the recycling of plant materials as fertilizers, thus requiring chemical fertilizers with a corresponding additional energy input. The residues...

Source characteristics

Abiogenic sources can be distinguished as physical processes (dispersed soil dust and sea spray), geochemical processes (gaseous emanations, volcanic eruptions), and atmospheric chemical processes (lightning causing nitrogen oxides). Biogenic processes in wild and agricultural plants are the same in principle. The main difference lies in the input of chemicals (mainly fertilizers) onto farmland with the purpose to control and to accelerate the plant growth. Cultivated soils produce soil dust by wind erosion is that a contribution by anthropogenic or natural sources Nonetheless, desert dust is globally the dominant source in this category. Changes in land use over hundreds or even thousands of years (for example, deforestation) have changed the quantity and the mix of VOC emissions from soils and vegetation. Biomass burning (wildfires) is nowadays almost all attributed to human activity, whether intentional or not the only natural cause is lightning strikes, which are of minor...

Agriculture and poverty alleviation

Apart from the social problems of large-scale agriculture, there are also serious environmental problems. A focus on cash crops for export often means that sooner or later high-yield varieties with a corresponding need for soil, irrigation, fertilizers and pesticides will be planted, often subsidized. Under these conditions, positive energy and greenhouse gas balances are difficult to attain and there will be negative environmental effects on, for instance, biodiversity. The use of genetically modified organisms in the production of industrial bioenergy raises many unresolved questions about risks (mostly environmental) and side effects (mostly health). The technology involved is also linked to the centralized control by a few large companies over seeds and plant varieties.

Atmosphere LandOcean Interactions

The vulnerability of the land-river-marine transport and fate system (conveyor belt) depends on the regional functioning of the hydrological cycle and on the way its dynamics are driven by patterns of water use, changes in land use practices affecting mobilization of carbon and nutrients to and through channels, and ultimately how the seas of the continental margins respond to these changes in forcing. Under scenarios of an increased hydrological cycle and changes in land use, river flow could increase, leading to increased ability of rivers to carry materials. Conversely, those areas subject to drier conditions would incur reduced flow and a reduced capacity of rivers to mobilize materials. Regardless of climate changes, an increased demand for water for agricultural and for urban and industrial practices would reduce water available to be routed down channels. Changes in forcing from upstream would affect coastal receiving waters. Decreases in river flow (from either drier climates...

Other Sequestration Methods

Based on a report in Environmental News Network, a company called Carbon Sciences has developed a relatively simple technology that puts the mixture under pressure and temperature to create precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). PCC is a common component of many products used everyday such as paper, plastic, wallboard, food additives, pharmaceuticals, vinyl siding, fencing, agricultural products, and fertilizer.

The lesson from the past

The ongoing rapid increase in atmospheric N2O, which started during the 19th century, is mainly attributed to the increase of agricultural activities (Kroeze et al, 1999 Ishijima et al, 2007), which in turn was caused by the expansion of agricultural land and industrialization that came along with the increasing availability of agricultural fertilizers triggered by the development of the Haber-Bosch process (see Chapters 4 and 5). A potential indirect contribution by oceanic sources (for example increased N2O emissions as a result of eutrophication of coastal areas) has not been quantified yet.

Agricultural Disturbances

Succession can be interrupted at various stages by agricultural practices, such as cultivation and applications of fertilizer and pesticide (Ferris and Ferris, 1974 Wasilewska, 1979). Such interruptions reduce diversity and successional maturity. Maturity indices are based on the principles of succession and relative sensitivity of various nematode taxa to stress or disruption of the successional sequence (Bongers, 1990). Indices that describe associations within biological communities, such as a maturity index, are less variable than measures of abundance of a single taxonomic or functional group and are, thus, more reliable as measures of ecosystem condition (Neher et al., 1995).

Nutrient Retention In Marginal Areas

Experimental addition of nutrients in arctic sites makes it possible to provide some quantification of the capacity for nutrient retention. In a prolonged study documented for 3-10 years and carried out at 13 sites in Alaska on Eriophorum vaginatum, E. angustifolium and Carex aquatilis the effects of fertilizer on flowering were in some cases still significant after six years (Shaver & Chapin, 1995). These three species belong to the ecological group often referred to as graminoids, which in comparison with some other species show the greatest capacity to respond to additional nutrients. They are also less sensitive to temperature in their absorption of phosphate and ammonium. All three species examined, namely Carex aquatilis, Dupontia fischeri and Eriophorum angustifolium, can absorb phosphate at 1 C at 20-60 of the rate at 20 C (Kielland & Chapin, 1992). As already mentioned, graminoid species are also able to absorb free amino acids which occur in the high soluble nitrogen...

Effects of Soil Tillage

Literature reports contrasting findings on the impact of soil tillage on crop yield and environmental quality, depending on soil (texture, structure, SOM content) and weather (rainfall distribution and intensity) conditions, as well as cropping systems (crop, rotation, and management of crop residues) (Lal 1989 Barberi 2006). Moldboard plowing is considered the soil tillage method most harmful to SOM maintenance, because of deep soil layer disturbance and dilution of fresh organic matter (i.e., crop residues, organic fertilizers) in the soil profile (Pagliai et al. 1998).

Ricardian Estimates for Developing Countries and Canada

That is, NR Q - X, where NR is net revenue per hectare and X is the amount of purchased input i per hectare (mainly hired labor and fertilizer). With such inputs held constant, a yield shock from climate change translates directly into the same change in net revenue ANR AQ.

Changes In Emissions To The Atmosphere

Table 5.3 Disposal of animal manure on grazing land and application in pastoral and mixed industrial systems, and N fertilizer use for 1970, _1995 and 2030 (N in Tg yr)_ Table 5.3 Disposal of animal manure on grazing land and application in pastoral and mixed industrial systems, and N fertilizer use for 1970, _1995 and 2030 (N in Tg yr)_ Fertilizer Global direct emissions of N2O from animal manure calculated according to (IMAGE-team, 2001) strongly increased from 1.2 to 1.4 Tg N2O-N yr between 1970 and 1995 (Table 5.5). For the coming three decades a further increase to 1.7 Tg is projected. In the period 1970 to 1995 the N2O emission from N fertilizers increased rapidly from 0.4 to 1.0 Tg N2O-N yr, and a further 30 increase to 1.4 Tg N2O-N yr 2030 is projected for 2030. Ammonia emissions are calculated with different approaches for stable and grazing emissions (Bouwman et al., 1997) and manure and fertilizer application (Bouwman et al., 2002). Emissions increased from 21 Tg yr in 1970...

Methane consumption by soils

1990 Yavitt et al., 1990 Mosier et al., 1991 Striegl et al., 1992). In well-aerated soils, methanotrophs can use CH4 as a source of carbon and, by oxidation to CO2, as a source of energy. Globally, this oxidation represents a significant sink for CH4 (Smith and Conen, 2004). Converting native ecosystems to agricultural use tends to reduce the soil sink strength (Ojima et al., 1993 Willison et al., 1995 Dobbie et al., 1996 Prieme et al., 1997 Smith et al., 2000). Resolving the reason for this reduction is not easy because many changes occur simultaneously when native ecosystems are converted to agricultural use, but application of NH+-containing fertilizers (Mosier et al., 1991 H tsch et al., 1994 King and Schnell, 1994) and physical disturbance have been implicated as likely causes (H tsch, 2001).

Impacts Of Present And Future Climate Change And Climate Variability On Agriculture In The Temperate Regions North

The potential impact of climate variability and climate change on agricultural production in the United States and Canada varies generally by latitude. Largest reductions are projected in southern crop areas due to increased temperatures and reduced water availability. A longer growing season and projected increases in CO2 may enhance crop yields in northern growing areas. Major factors in these scenarios analyzes are increased drought tendencies and more extreme weather events, both of which are detrimental to agriculture. Increasing competition for water between agriculture and non-agricultural users also focuses attention on water management issues. Agriculture also has impact on the greenhouse gas balance. Forests and soils are natural sinks for CO2. Removal of forests and changes in land use, associated with the conversion from rural to urban domains, alters these natural sinks. Agricultural livestock and rice cultivation are leading contributors to methane emission...

Nitrate Contamination

During the last few decades agricultural productivity has increased enough to keep pace with the rapid increase in global population. This dramatic increase in productivity is largely due to improvements in crop varieties and associated increases in the use of fertilizers and pesticides, technical innovations sometimes collectively referred to as the Green revolution. The benefits of these innovations are apparent and relatively easy to document. What is not so apparent are the costs, both to human health and to the environment in general. Concerns about these costs have generated debates and have led to a number of regulations, especially in the developed countries. Many of the issues which arise in the case of fertilizer application can be illustrated with the case of nitrate use in Germany. The increased use of nitrogen fertilizer for agriculture introduces additional nitrate into the biosphere. In order to put the issue in perspective, the nitrogen balance for Germany is...

The Response Of Agriculture To Climate Change

The effect of increased temperature can have either a positive or negative effect, based on geography. For instance, for the colder high-latitude locations such as Alaska and Canada, warmer temperatures would enable the existence of longer growing seasons. This could encourage the possibility of extended growing seasons as long as soil conditions are adequate. If soil conditions are not adequate and are not fertile enough (lacking proper nutrients and soil structure) to support the growth of crops, the length of the growing season will not matter because growing crops would not be successful. Adding large doses of fertilizer to increase fertility is also not a good option because they can have negative effects on the environment, such as being washed off into the drainage and entering and polluting the water cycle and biogeo-chemical systems.

CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use

In mechanized farming, fossil fuel is used both to power farm implements and to manufacture and transport fertilizers, pesticides and machinery. Adopting NT usually conserves energy by eliminating energy-intensive tillage and reducing the wear on tillage equipment. The amount of energy saved depends on the previous tillage intensity. For a subhumid site in western Canada, Zentner et al. (2004) found that NT, compared to CT, reduced on-farm fuel and lubricants by 25-31 . In wetter regions where the intensity of CT systems is higher, NT may reduce tillage-related on-farm fossil energy use by up to 60 (West and Marland, 2002). Tillage accounts for only 30 or less of total energy use, so energy saved by reducing tillage can easily be offset by increased herbicide and particularly by fertilizer inputs. At sites in western Canada, for example, energy savings from reduced tillage intensity were completely offset by increased amounts of fertilizer N and herbicides (Zentner et al., 1998). In...

Thunderstorm Hailstorm and Dust storm

In most countries, afforestation of fields is the main measure to protect the soil from dust storms. Improving soil resistance to erosion can be achieved by careful selection of cultivation methods, applying mineral and organic fertilizers, sowing grass and spraying various substances which enhance soil structure. It is also important to reduce the areas where a dust can gather, especially in tracts characterized by erosion. One major protection strategy is to establish well developed plant cover before the dust storms period, ttis can encourage a reduction in the wind speed in the layer above the ground by forming an effective buffer.

Phosphorus Plant Biodiversity and Climate Change

Abstract Phosphorus (P) is a major plant nutrient. Its increasing use as a fertilizer has helped to raise crop and fodder production. However, the global reserves and resources of P are finite, demanding an efficient use of P. Under natural conditions, it is often in limited supply. Plants have developed adaptations to small soil P concentrations. Increased P levels can have unwanted side effects like eutrophication and algal blooms. Besides, P concentrations in the soil have often been found to be negatively correlated with plant diversity. For sustainable agriculture, it is essential to understand 1) adaptations of plants to small P concentrations in soils to maintain production with decreasing P reserves, 2) influences of P on phytodiversity to minimize unwanted effects, and 3) future developments of P and phytodiversity in relation to climate change to adjust agricultural practices.

Wastewater Characteristics and Sources

Wastewaters from the manufacturing, processing, and formulation of inorganic chemicals such as phosphorus compounds, phosphates, and phosphate fertilizers cannot be exactly characterized. The wastewater streams are usually expected to contain trace or large concentrations of all raw materials used in the plant all intermediate compounds produced during manufacture all final products, coproducts, and byproducts and the auxiliary or processing chemicals employed. It is desirable from the viewpoint of economics that these substances not be lost, but some losses and spills appear unavoidable and some intentional dumping does take place during housecleaning, vessel emptying, and preparation operations. The federal guidelines 8 for state and local pretreatment programs reported the raw wastewater characteristics (Table 4) in mg L concentration, and flows and quality parameters (Table 5) based on the production of 1 ton of the product manufactured, for each of the six subcategories of the...

O Ito and M Kondo Introduction

The semi-arid tropics (SAT) hold one-sixth of the world population, half of which subsists on less than a dollar a day. The agricultural productivity in the region should be improved to meet an ever-growing population which will reach 8.5 billion by 2025 and exceed 10 billion by 2500, according to the prediction made by the United Nations. The major constraints to agricultural production in SAT are unpredictable weather and poor accessibility to agricultural resources, which forces the farmers to take an option of low input farming systems. Among several options available at the farm level, N fertilizer management would be most suitable to The fertilizer application is a risky investment for the farmers in SAT because of the heavy rainfall at the onset of each growing season, which leads to a considerable leaching loss of the nutrient element applied, and unreliable rainfall, which periodically results in a fatal crop failure. Fertilizer application does not always bring more income...

The net result a simple example

As shown in Table 5.2, the 30 years after adoption of NT are divided into three 10-year phases an initial decade where soils are gaining carbon and N2O emissions are influenced by higher fertilizer N requirements a second decade where carbon accumulation continues but at a lower rate, and N2O emissions subside as fertilizer N inputs are reduced and a third decade where soil carbon is assumed to have reached a new steady state, and the NT system is mature. Mean non-renewable energy inputs for a continuous spring wheat rotation under CT and NT management were calculated from values presented by Zentner et al. (1998). For this example, fertilizer N rates on NT were increased by 10 during the first decade to account for the additional nitrogen immobilized, and were equivalent to CT thereafter. Fertilizer-induced emissions (FIE) of N2O were calculated assuming that 1.25 of applied nitrogen is emitted as N2O (IPCC, 1997). Recent research suggests that N2O emissions tend to be lower from NT...

Effluent Standards in Other Countries

The control of wastewater discharges from the phosphate and phosphate fertilizer industry in various countries differs significantly, as is the case with effluents from other Table 11 Effluent Limitations (mg L except for pH) for Subpart G, Mixed and Blend Fertilizer Table 11 Effluent Limitations (mg L except for pH) for Subpart G, Mixed and Blend Fertilizer

InPlant Control Recycle and Process Modification

The primary consideration for in-plant control of pollutants that enter waste streams through random accidental occurrences, such as leaks, spills, and process upsets, is establishing loss prevention and recovery systems. In the case of fertilizer manufacture, a significant portion of contaminants may be separated at the source from process wastes by dedicated recovery systems, improved plant operations, retention of spilled liquids, and the installation of localized interceptors of leaks such as oil drip trays for pumps and compressors 17 . Also, certain treatment systems installed (i.e., ion-exchange, oil recovery, and hydrolyzer-stripper systems) may, in effect, be recovery systems for direct or indirect reuse of effluent constituents. Finally, the use of effluent gas scrubbers to improve in-plant operations by preventing gaseous product losses may also prevent the airborne deposition of various pollutants within the general plant area, from where they end up as surface drainage...

Agriculture in the Semi Arid Tropics

Despite the harsh environmental conditions, the rate of population increase has been high in the past and will be kept high(er) in the near future. To feed the growing population, more foods should be produced, by improving productivity of the lands and crops and by developing more sophisticated and sustainable ways of resource management. Due to the unpredictable weather and to poor accessibility of agricultural resources such as fertilizers, the cropping options for farmers are restricted to low input farming systems. High rainfall, which often comes at the onset of each growing season, greatly reduces the efficiency of fertilizer for crop uptake. The fear of a fatal crop failure due to drought makes the farmers reluctant to apply sufficient fertilizer for crop growth. Most crops in the region are grown with no fertilizer or insufficient amounts of fertilizer, due to the consideration of safe investment.

Implications for Other Practices

Perhaps the most obvious is the urgency of accounting for all GHGs in assessing how well a proposed practice might reduce emissions (Robertson and Grace, 2004 Mosier et al., 2005). Although much of the early focus, justifiably, was on soil carbon sequestration, agriculture is a major contributor of N2O and CH4, both potent GHGs. Because of the high GWPs of these gases, small shifts in their emissions can substantially augment or offset the benefits from any soil carbon gain. So we cannot consider only the soil carbon accrual from reduced tillage we have to estimate the effects on N2O emission. We cannot limit our attention only to the SOC gains from planting grasses we have to think about the CH4 emitted when those grasses are fed to livestock. We cannot examine only the SOC benefits of practices that favour higher yields we have to quan-tiffy the N2O emitted from higher fertilizer rates needed to support those yields and the energy consumed in making...

Phosphate Manufacturing

In ammonium phosphate production and mixed and blend fertilizer manufacturing, one possibility is the integration of an ammonia process condensate steam stripping column into the condensate-boiler feedwater systems of an ammonia plant, with or without further stripper bottoms treatment depending on the boiler quality makeup needed. 3. In ammonium phosphate and mixed and blend fertilizer (G) production, another possibility is to design for a lower-pressure steam level (i.e., 42-62 atm) in the ammonia plant to make process condensate recovery easier and less costly.

Effects of Organic Matter Amendments

Animal manures and compost can be valuable nutrients sources to crops. In addition, while their amendments to soils represent a convenient disposal and recycle of considerable amounts of wastes, they allow to limit the application of mineral fertilizers and, thus, save farm money and energy. A number of studies have shown that manure addition is beneficial to soil in terms of plant productivity and soil quality (Haynes and Naidu 1998 Edmeades 2003). A long-term experimental platform exists at the TO site in close proximity of the MESCOSAGR experiment, where organic fertilizers are tested. This platform was intended to evaluate management options of livestock farming in terms of crop production, soil quality, and environment impact. Different maize-based cropping systems are fertilized with bovine farmyard manure or slurry, in comparison to urea. It was therein found that tested organic fertilizers made N available to crops to the same extent as urea and were better retained in the...

Table 15 Phosphate Manufacturing Industry Wastewater Treatment Practises and Unit Removal Efficiencies and Effluent pH

The wastewater is again treated with a second lime addition to raise the pH level from 8 to at least 9 (where phosphate removal rates of 95 may be achieved), although two-stage dosing to pH 11 may be employed. Concentrations of phosphorus and fluoride with a magnitude of 6500 and 9000 mg L, respectively, can be reduced to 5-500 mg L P and 30-60 mg L F. Soluble orthophosphate and lime react to form an insoluble precipitate, calcium hydroxy apatite 17 . Sludges formed by lime addition to phosphate wastes from phosphate manufacturing or fertilizer production are generally compact and possess good settling and dewatering characteristics, and removal rates of 80-90 for both phosphate and fluoride may be readily achieved 13 . Mixed fertilizer (subcategory G) treatment technology consists of a closed-loop contaminated water system, which includes a retention pond to settle suspended solids. The water is then recycled back to the system. There are no liquid waste streams associated with the...

Interaction Among Water Nutrients and Roots

On the other hand, nutrients, particularly nitrogen, are manageable by the farmers to some extent, though the natural supply is almost identical with the case of water. A considerable amount of N, mainly NO3 (roughly 100 to 200 kg ha-1) is usually found in the soil solution at the time of planting (Fig. 8.3). The entire amount of N disappears from the soil solution within 50 to 100 days, suggesting active dynamics of N in the soil solution during an initial cropping period. Since N accumulation in the crops is much less, and slow, as shown in Fig. 8.3, most of the N disappears from the system without being utilized by crops.8 This finding raises a question for the traditional farming practice of basal application of N fertilizer. It leads to the expectation that delayed N application will enhance the dependency of sorghum on native soil N, thereby increasing N use efficiency of the system. in many studies. Nitrogen from soil and fertilizer is finally released into the soil solution...

Environmental Impacts of the Project

Other environmental benefits claimed are reduced soil erosion and the regulation of hydrological flows in the watershed, improving soil health and contributing to climate stabilization. Importantly the project will act as a demonstration to other areas plowing, which results in severe soil erosion, is avoided by establishing trees manually, and careful control of fertilizers and insecticide use minimize threats to downstream water quality. (The biodiversity benefits of this project, and of A R projects generally, are reviewed in some detail in Chapter 4.)

Crop and Resource Management in Low Input Farming Systems

Nitrogen fertilizer application is a management practice that can be easily modified by farmers in terms of time and method of application. The method of application would considerably affect N fertilizer use efficiency (NFUE), which indicates how much proportion of N applied as fertilizer is utilized by the crop. To minimize the amount of N fertilizer which is not utilized by crops, in other words to increase NFUE, timing of application should be well synchronized with patterns of N supply from the soil and with crop requirement. In regions where intercropping is commonly practiced, most farmers do not apply, or apply very low doses (less than 25 kg N ha-1), of N fertilizer, because of economic, logistic and social reasons. When N is applied, the farmers prefer basal to delayed applica Delayed urea-N application results in a higher NFUE in sorghum than a basal application (Fig 8.4). The NFUE of sole crop pigeonpea is higher (14.6) than that of intercrop pigeonpea (1.8-3.9), because...

Discussion And Conclusion

Agricultural production doubled in Central America from 1961 to 2001. As we expected, the greater proportion of this increase came from agricultural intensification, rather than from the expansion of agricultural land or labour investments. Extensification was greatest in the countries of most abundant remaining forestland, Guatemala and Costa Rica. However, intensification in the form of fertilizer usage increased dramatically in all nations and was highest in the nations of greatest rural development and most earnest export agriculture, Costa Rica and El Salvador. These countries also experienced the most rapid urbanization and had the smallest proportion of rural dwellers in 2001, suggesting that agricultural output per labourer, due to capital investments in mechanization and chemical inputs, increased disproportionately to agricultural output in these countries. Lastly, the more developed countries such as Costa Rica and El Salvador manifested a combination of earlier...

Emerging Phosphorus Removal Technologies

Chemical precipitation of the newly released phosphate in the phosphate stripper effluent (i.e., a P-rich, low-volume sidestream containing 40-80 mg L P amounting to about 10-15 of the total wastewater flow) using lime, ferric chloride, or alum, and subsequently flotation of the P-rich precipitated chemical sludge for reuse as a fertilizer using a high-rate DAF clarifier (15 min DT).

Agricultures Role in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The application of synthetic nitrogen and organic fertilizers is a leading contributor to N2O emissions. Bacterial action on the chemical fertilizers results in the release of N2O. The gas is released when soil microbes digest the fertilizers. The more inorganic nitrogen-based fertilizers that are applied, the more N2O goes into Rosenzweig and Hillel (2000) noted that proper land management aimed at enhancing soil organic matter improves soil fertility and soil structure, reduces soil erosion, and helps to mitigate the greenhouse effect. It is estimated that methane comprised about 11 of U.S. greenhouse gas emission in 1995. The improvement in animal breeding and husbandry, the adoption of biotechnology, and the current declining trend in the consumption of milk and red meat could cut methane emission by 20 . Research on ways and means of capturing methane released from manure management systems and using the captured methane as an on-farm energy resource showed that it is...

Mitigation And Adaptation Responses

The practice of agriculture plays a major role in the global carbon cycle (Figure 10.9) (Rosenzweig and Tubiello, 2004 Rosenzweig and Hillel, 2000). On a global scale, the process of photosynthesis by agricultural crops fixes about 2 Gt C year-1, with about 1 Gt C year1 providing sustenance for the world's population that is respired back to the atmosphere as it is consumed about 1 Gt C is returned to the soil annually as plant residues. Some of the latter carbon, however, subsequently is returned to the atmosphere by soil microbial activity, and some is stored in the soil matrix. Furthermore, the fossil fuel that powers the machinery to sow, irrigate, harvest, and dry crops worldwide is responsible for atmospheric emissions of about 150 MT (million metric tons) C year-1. Large amounts of fossil fuel energy are used to produce fertilizers, especially nitrogenous compounds. Rice cultivation, livestock production, and soil processes are also responsible for considerable methane and...

Mitigation and Sequestration

During farming practices, carbon inputs to soil can be increased by three major methods (1) using crop rotations with high-residue yields, (2) reducing or eliminating the fallow period between successive crops in annual crop rotations, and (3) by using fertilizer efficiently. It is also important to apply manure, nitrogen fertilizers, and irrigation efficiently. If too much fertilizer is used, it offsets the benefits of the carbon stored in the soil because it increases the levels of N2O. Each area needs to be assessed for its specific needs so that a proper balance is reached, and an area gets only the fertilizer it will actually utilize no more (which will simply be left behind in the soil or washed into another source by the irrigation).

Renewable Energy Technologies

Biogas is produced through biogas plants. These plants operate using waste from paper and sugar production, sewage, animal waste, and other biodegradable wastes. These wastes are slurried together and allowed to ferment with bacteria to produce methane gas. This methane gas is a renewable natural gas used for cooking, heating, and electricity production. In Asia, many developing countries such as India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Bhutan, have individual household biogas plants to meet household energy demands. There is immense viability to having commercial biogas plants. Current sewage treatment plants can easily be converted to biogas plants. Once the methane gas is extracted from waste, the remaining sludge can be used as a fertilizer. It is five times higher in nitrogen than compost produced from the same biomass.

Vulnerability of the Agricultural Sector

Even in the highly industrialized United States, agriculture is highly vulnerable to the vagaries of climate and the complex interactions between farming and the environment. Farming has successfully produced food and fiber but it also caused environmental degradation. Worldwide degradation of agricultural land causing irreversible loss of productivity is estimated to be 6 million hectares per year (Lal et al., 1998). Soil erosion by wind and water has been significant, but any decline in yields has been largely offset by greater use of fertilizers. However, off-farm pollution due to runoff of fertilizer and agrichemicals has increased. As a result of these issues, an alternative approach to conventional farming practices has evolved. This approach focuses on the reduction of environmentally damaging use of fertilizers and chemical pesticides through processes that directly or indirectly (by reducing waste) affect fertilizer and pesticide consumption. These processes include improved...

Major developments in agriculture

The domestic agricultural market of the country collapsed. Trade exchange between city and village vanished. Between 1917 and 1921, the urban population of Russia fell by one-third as former peasants returned to their villages. Industry was destroyed. The production of food, clothes, and shoes fell 7.5-fold. The production of agricultural machines fell 31-fold, and production of mineral fertilizers stopped completely. Thus the city had nothing to give to the villages, and the villages stopped supplying the cities with agricultural products.

Production of Biofuels

The Environmental Defense Fund has determined that a key factor in how effective biofuels are in fighting global warming is the energy efficiency of their production methods. These include everything from running plows and harvesters to manufacturing pesticides and fertilizer to converting the material into fuel and transporting it. Improving land use through sustainable practices such as no-till farming, and boosting energy efficiencies make biofuels more effective at reducing heat-trapping pollution.

Coevolution and Migration of Bean and Rhizobia in Europe

Abstract The legumes crop common bean is one of the most important crops for the human nutrition common bean is the protein basis from developing countries. Common bean presents many limitations such as the deficiencies or toxicities of minerals in soils. These limitations in common bean production regions occur throughout the world. To overcome mineral deficiencies and toxicities, common bean growers must use corrective soil amendments. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) is important as a source of N for agriculture, because the use of nitrogenous fertilizers has resulted in unacceptable levels of water and atmosphere pollution and by nitrate and N2O emissions, contributing to the increase of greenhouse effect. The common bean grown in Europe, and other continents, is the result of a process of domestication and evolution, from wild forms found exclusively in the Americas, and it is possible to distinguish two major domestication centres, Andean and Mesoamerican centers. Most of the...

Agricultural Challenges

Higher fertilizer uptake (raise nutrient More intensive production systems may lead to land degradation, if they are applied year after year on the same area. The main types of land degradation are soil erosion from wind and water, chemical degradation (e.g. nutrient loss, salinisation, pollution), and physical degradation (e.g. compaction, waterlogging). Land degradation is a very important issue in some geographic regions, but it remains unclear whether it may become a serious threat to global food supply (Doos, 2002 Rosegrant et al., 1997). While in some parts of the industrialised world problems of fertilizer overuse, like nitrate leaching and eutrophication, are of considerable concern, in many developing regions, like Sub-Saharan Africa, inadequate replenishment of removed nutrients reduce soil fertility and increase erosion. Hence, in order to assure sufficient nutrient supply for more intensive production on a global scale, the demand for fertilizer will rise. Especially...

Adaptation Strategies

Erosion in the Great Plains was reduced after devastating losses of valuable topsoil during the dust bowl years of the 1930s by planting shelterbelts of trees to reduce wind erosion. Reduction of summer fallow practice and move to minimum or zero tillage are management practices which have reduced erosion and promoted higher soil organic matter (McRay et al., 2000, Chapter 7). Other means of alternative agriculture included systematically incorporating natural processes, such as nutrient cycles, nitrogen fixation, and pest-predator relationships into the agricultural production process reducing the use of chemicals and fertilizers making greater use of the biological and genetic potential of plant and animal species improving the match between cropping patterns and the productive potential and physical limitations of agricultural lands in order to ensure the long-term sustain-ability of the land and, emphasizing improved farm management and conservation of the soil, water, and...

Table 42 Decrease in area of valuable market crops in Russia from 1917 to 1920 percent

Losses of working livestock reached more than 35 percent (according to some experts between 38 and 39 percent). Lower livestock numbers meant a reduction in manure for fertilizer and a shortage of draught animals. Farm equipment could not be used and more peasants had to sow by hand. About 40 percent of agricultural machinery was lost as well. Any amelioration works were stopped completely. Intensive farming was replaced by the badly organized ploughing of arable land. Mineral fertilizers were no longer used by the peasants.

The Wastewater Nitrogen Cycle

Nitrogen fixation, namely the conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonium ions, is achieved by the enzyme nitrogenase that is found only in nitrogen-fixing bacteria (Equation 9.1). Prior to the widespread use of nitrogen fertilizers, nodule-growing plants or legumes provided soil nitrogen. Examples of legumes include alfalfa, clover, and soybeans.

Responses to Water Applications

However, water addition has in some cases interacted with temperature enhancement or fertilizer addition and increased the productivity of single plant species (Press et al., 1998a). Surprisingly, water even when applied in moderate amounts can have negative effect on dry plant communities. Robinson et al. (1998) found that combined water and fertilizer addition to a high arctic semidesert caused high winter injury of plants in some years, probably because winter hardening was delayed (Press et al., 1998b).

Renewables and Noncarbon Energy Sources

Biomass production is limited by the photosynthetic efficiency of conversion of solar energy, which on a canopy scale is capped at about 2-3 percent during the growing season. One must consider the phenology of the plant system, which may leave the landscape bare or sparse a considerable portion of the year, reducing annual mean photo-synthetic conversion efficiency (Baldocchi and Valentini, Chapter 15, this volume). Additional energy inputs may be required for cultivation and for fertilizers in order to prevent soil degradation. Land availability is limited by competition with other needs. Furthermore, a significant portion of the terrestrial biosphere is nonarable, where scarce imported water would be needed to produce biomass.

Official Download Page Fertilizers Home Made Formulas

The legit version of Fertilizers Home Made Formulas is not distributed through other stores. An email with the special link to download the ebook will be sent to you if you ordered this version.

Download Now